Tony Pantalleresco Radio Show Notes – Week Ending July 7th 2013

So here we are again playing catch up. Tony has all his July 2013 Radio show notes posted on his website )www.augmentinforce.50webs.com)

The weather here inLondon UK is HOT! it’s great, no complaining from me. We have been waiting for this weather for far too long. I have been reading allot of Dr Joel Wallachs books recently and listning to his “dead Doctors Don’t lie” radio show and I have to say this guy knows his stuff. In fact he is a bit of a living legend. I will post about him soon so I wont go on here. But one thing is for sure, in this hot weather you really need to make sure you replace all the nutrients you are sweating out. It’s not just water, or even water and sodium you are sweating out, Dr Wallach tells us its a soup of the whole 90 essential nutrients that we are loosing! So supplement, Juice lots of veg, drink your raw milk and coconut juice! replenish replenish replenish!

Ok so here goes, Mr Pantallerescos show notes for week ending July 7th 2013

Topics :

Scientists Uncover How Grapefruits Provide a Secret Weapon in Medical Drug Delivery

Herbals and Foods For Anti Cancer for Intestines- St John’swort Species and Apigenin

Herbal Extract Rhodiola rosea Boosts Fruit Fly Lifespan by Nearly 25 Percent

Testosterone Therapy May Help Improve Pain in Men With Low Testosterone

Statin Myths

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Scientists Uncover How Grapefruits Provide a Secret Weapon in Medical Drug Delivery
May 21, 2013 — Lipids (right panel first three tubes) derived from grapefruit. GNVs can efficiently deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including DNA, RNA (DIR-GNVs), proteins and anti-cancer drugs (GNVs-Drugs) as demonstrated in this study.—Grapefruits have long been known for their health benefits, and the subtropical fruit may revolutionize how medical therapies like anti-cancer drugs are delivered to specific tumor cells.—University of Louisville researchers have uncovered how to create nanoparticles using natural lipids derived from grapefruit, and have discovered how to use them as drug delivery vehicles. UofL scientists Huang-Ge Zhang, D.V.M., Ph.D., Qilong Wang, Ph.D., and their team today (May 21, 2013), published their findings in Nature Communications.—-”These nanoparticles, which we’ve named grapefruit-derived nanovectors (GNVs), are derived from an edible plant, and we believe they are less toxic for patients, result in less biohazardous waste for the environment, and are much cheaper to produce at large scale than nanoparticles made from synthetic materials,” Zhang said.—-The researchers demonstrated that GNVs can transport various therapeutic agents, including anti-cancer drugs, DNA/RNA and proteins such as antibodies. Treatment of animals with GNVs seemed to cause less adverse effects than treatment with drugs encapsulated in synthetic lipids.—”Our GNVs can be modified to target specific cells — we can use them like missiles to carry a variety of therapeutic agents for the purpose of destroying diseased cells[F1] ,” he said. “Furthermore, we can do this at an affordable price.”—The therapeutic potential of grapefruit derived nanoparticles was further validated through a Phase 1 clinical trial for treatment of colon cancer patients. So far, researchers have observed no toxicity in the patients who orally took the anti-inflammatory agent curcumin encapsulated in grapefruit nanoparticles.——–The UofL scientists also plan to test whether this technology can be applied in the treatment of inflammation related autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.—A Common Sense Approach—–Zhang said he began this research by considering how our ancestors selected food to eat. –”The fruits and vegetables we buy from the grocery today were passed down from generation to generation as favorable and nutritious for the human body. On the flip side, outcomes were not favorable for our ancestors who ate poisonous mushrooms, for example,” he said. “It made sense for us to consider eatable plants as a mechanism to create medical nanoparticles as a potential non-toxic therapeutic delivery vehicle.”[F2] —In addition to grapefruit, Zhang and his team analyzed the nanoparticles from tomatoes and grapes. Grapefruits were chosen for further exploration because a larger quantity of lipids can be derived from this fruit.–Story Source–The above story is reprinted from materials provided by University of Louisville.

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Herbals and Foods For Anti Cancer for Intestines

Water extracts of tree Hypericum sps. protect DNA from oxidative and alkylating damage and enhance DNA repair in colon cells.

Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jan;51:80-6

Authors: Ramos AA, Marques F, Fernandes-Ferreira M, Pereira-Wilson C

Abstract
Diet may induce colon carcinogenesis through oxidative or alkylating DNA damage. However, diet may also contain anticarcinogenic compounds that contribute to cancer prevention. DNA damage prevention and/or induction of repair are two important mechanisms involved in cancer chemoprevention by dietary compounds. Hypericum sps. are widely used in traditional medicine to prepare infusions due to their beneficial digestive and neurologic effects. In this study, we investigated the potential of water extracts from three Hypericum sps. and some of their main phenolic compounds to prevent and repair oxidative and alkylating DNA damage in colon cells. The results showed that water extracts of Hypericum perforatum-( St John’sWort), Hypericum androsaemum- (Tutsan), Hypericum undulatum- ( Wavy St John’s Wort ), quercetin and rutin have protective effect against oxidative DNA damage in HT29 cells. Protective effect was also observed against alkylating DNA damage induced by methyl-methanesulfonate ( MSM), except for H. androsaemum. With regard to alkylating damage repair H. perforatum, H. androsaemum and chlorogenic acid increased repair of alkylating DNA damage by base excision repair pathway. No effect was observed on nucleotide excision repair pathway. Antigenotoxic effects of Hypericum sps. may contribute to colon cancer prevention and the high amount of phenolic compounds present in Hypericum sps. play an important role in DNA protective effects.-PMID: 23000446 [PubMed - in process]

Remedy—Simplest way of utilizing any form of St John’s would be in tea form —after a meal—would increase protection and assist in the reversing of damage to colon area—in making the tea use 1 tablespoon in a 2-3 pint pot of distilled water—bring to a boil —rolling boil is good or when starting shut off stove after the boiling occurs this will reduce heat and allow to simmer—drank before bed with other herbs like lemon balm or Melissa or lavender may for some induce relaxation and sleep

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Apigenin and its impact on gastrointestinal cancers.

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2013 Jan;57(1):126-44

Authors: Lefort ÉC, Blay J

Abstract
Apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone, 5,7-dihydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) is a flavonoid found in many fruits, vegetables, and herbs, the most abundant sources being the leafy herb parsley and dried flowers of chamomile. Present in dietary sources as a glycoside, it is cleaved in the gastrointestinal lumen to be absorbed and distributed as apigenin itself. For this reason, the epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract is exposed to higher concentrations of apigenin than tissues at other locations. This would also be true for epithelial cancers of the gastrointestinal tract. We consider the evidence for actions of apigenin that might hinder the ability of gastrointestinal cancers to progress and spread. Apigenin has been shown to inhibit cell growth, sensitize cancer cells to elimination by apoptosis, and hinder the development of blood vessels to serve the growing tumor. It also has actions that alter the relationship of the cancer cells with their microenvironment. Apigenin is able to reduce cancer cell glucose uptake, inhibit remodeling of the extracellular matrix, inhibit cell adhesion molecules that participate in cancer progression, and oppose chemokine signaling pathways that direct the course of metastasis into other locations. As such, apigenin may provide some additional benefit beyond existing drugs in slowing the emergence of metastatic disease.–PMID: 23197449 [PubMed - in process]

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Herbal Extract Rhodiola rosea Boosts Fruit Fly Lifespan by Nearly 25 Percent
June 18, 2013 — The herbal extract of a yellow-flowered mountain plant long used for stress relief was found to increase the lifespan of fruit fly populations by an average of 24 percent, according to UC Irvine researchers.—But it’s how Rhodiola rosea, also known as golden root, did this that grabbed the attention of study leaders Mahtab Jafari and Sam Schriner. They discovered that Rhodiola works in a manner completely unrelated to dietary restriction and affects different molecular pathways.—This is significant, said Jafari, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences, because dietary restriction is considered the most robust method of improving lifespan in laboratory animals, and scientists have been scrambling to identify compounds that can mimic its effects.—”We found that Rhodiola actually increases lifespan on top of that of dietary restriction,” Jafari said. “It demonstrates that Rhodiola can act even in individuals who are already long-lived and healthy. This is quite unlike resveratrol, which appears to only act in overfed or unhealthy individuals.”—The researchers proved this by putting flies on a calorie-restricted diet. It has been shown that flies live longer when the amount of yeast they consume is decreased. Jafari and Schriner expected that if Rhodiola functioned in the same manner as dietary restriction, it would not work in these flies. But it did. They also tested Rhodiola in flies in which the molecular pathways of dietary restriction had been genetically inactivated. It still worked.[F3] —-Not only did Rhodiola improve lifespan an average of 24 percent in both sexes and multiple strains of flies, but it also delayed the loss of physical performance in flies as they aged and even extended the lives of old flies. Jafari’s group previously had shown that the extract decreased the natural production of reactive oxygen species molecules in the fly mitochondria and protected both flies and cultured human cells against oxidative stress.—Jafari and Schriner, an assistant project scientist in Jafari’s laboratory, are not claiming that Rhodiola supplements will enable humans to live longer, but their discovery is enhancing scientific understanding of how supplements believed to promote longevity actually work in the body.–Rhodiola has already shown possible health benefits in humans, such as decreasing fatigue, anxiety and depression; boosting mood, memory and stamina; and preventing altitude sickness. Grown in cold climates at high elevations, the herb has been used for centuries by Scandinavians and Russians to reduce stress. It’s also thought to have antioxidant properties.—Jafari’s research group is currently exploring the plant’s potential to kill cancer cells, improve Alzheimer’s disease and help stem cells grow.—Rhodiola is readily available online and in health food stores. Jafari, though, has analyzed several commercial products and found them to not contain sufficient amounts of the reputed active compounds — such as rosavin and salidroside — that characterize high-quality products.—Story Source-The above story is reprinted from materials provided by University of California – Irvine. –Journal Reference—Samuel E. Schriner, Kevin Lee, Stephanie Truong, Kathyrn T. Salvadora, Steven Maler, Alexander Nam, Thomas Lee, Mahtab Jafari. Extension of Drosophila Lifespan by Rhodiola rosea through a Mechanism Independent from Dietary Restriction. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (5): e63886 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0063886

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Testosterone Therapy May Help Improve Pain in Men With Low Testosterone
June 17, 2013 — Testosterone therapy is associated with decreased pain perception in men with low testosterone levels related to opioid (narcotic) pain relievers (analgesics), a new study finds. —The results were presented Monday at The Endocrine Society’s 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.—”In this study, we attempted to determine whether testosterone replacement improves pain perception and tolerance, and quality of life in men with low testosterone levels due to narcotic analgesics,” said the study’s lead author Shehzad Basaria, MD, Medical Director, Section of Men’s Health, Aging, & Metabolism at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, in Boston, MA. “We found that testosterone administration in these men was associated with a greater reduction in several measures of pain sensitivity during laboratory pain testing compared with men who were on placebo.”—Opioids belong to a class of pain-reducing drugs that are used to relieve chronic pain from injuries, surgery and cancer treatment. These drugs include morphine, codeine, fentanyl and oxycodone, and are among the most frequently prescribed medications in the United States today.–In addition to being highly addictive, opioid use is associated with a number of side effects, including suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in both women and men, resulting in decreased testosterone production. Low testosterone, in turn, can result in sexual dysfunction, decreased muscle mass, increased fat mass and decreased quality of life.–Previous animal research has demonstrated that castration of rodents is associated with increased pain perception while testosterone replacement reduces pain perception, suggesting an analgesic effect of this sex steroid. Whether these beneficial effects can be replicated in humans, however, remained unclear.—In this study, investigators found that, compared to placebo, testosterone therapy significantly improved pain perception and tolerance during laboratory pain testing. Testosterone therapy also improved some aspects of quality of life.—”If larger studies confirm these findings, testosterone therapy in this patient population may be beneficial in improving pain perception,” Basaria said.—The study included 84 men ages 18-64 years old with opioid-induced testosterone deficiency. Their average age was 49 years. Of this group, 65 participants completed the study. Investigators randomly assigned participants to receive either testosterone gel, applied to the skin, or placebo, for 14 weeks. Thirty-six men received the testosterone gel, and 29 received a placebo.—At the beginning of the study, and then again at 14 weeks, the investigators assessed pain measures and quality-of-life parameters.—Solvay (now Abbott) Pharmaceuticals, Inc. funded the study.

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Statin Myths

#1. Biological Mechanisms Behind Statin Side Effects: Duane Graveline, the M.D. who goes by the nickname “Spacedoc” has done everything he can to inform the public of the dangers of statin drugs. Dr. Graveline is a former NASA astronaut and Air Force flight surgeon. His reasons for taking on the challenge of debunking statins are very personal, because he developed global transient amnesia while taking Lipitor, an unnerving experience that deprives you of all memory of events in your life looking back several decades.

Since then, he has conducted extensive research on the biological mechanisms behind the diverse severe side effects of statin drugs. The link above is but one branch of a vast network of frightening yet informative information about the potentially devastating long-term effects of statin therapy.

#2. Statins and Nerve Damage: The People’s Pharmacy is a wonderful forum that allows patients to share their experience. This is one of many examples of adverse side effects of statin drugs available on that site.

#3. Statins and Pregnancy: Like thalidomide, statin drugs are a class X drug with regard to pregnancy, meaning they are contraindicated and should NOT be taken by pregnant women. They can cause significant damage to the nervous system of a developing embryo.

#4. New York Times Exposes Potential for Misdiagnosis Caused by Statin Use: This article points out some of the severe side effects statins can cause, and illustrates with a poignant story about a woman from Kansas. She had been taking a statin for years to reduce her cholesterol. Over that same time period, she experienced chronic muscle pain which neither she nor her doctor attributed to the statin therapy. It even led to a useless shoulder operation.—Her problem eventually escalated into skin lesions caused by a reaction to toxic protein by-products released by her disintegrating muscles. She was given an antifungal to treat the skin lesions, another misdiagnosis. But the antifungal interacted with the statins to further increase the severity of her muscle disorders. Three months later, she could barely stand, and her pulmonary muscles were so weak she couldn’t breathe. She died shortly thereafter.

#5. The International Network of Cholesterol Skeptics (THINCS): Dr. Uffe Ravnskov has campaigned tirelessly to fight the myth that high cholesterol is damaging to your health. This web page contains valuable information about all the ways in which cholesterol keeps you healthy.

#6. The ASEPSIS Trial: The statin industry continues to claim that statins protect against sepsis because of several retrospective studies that show that those who take statins have less risk than those who don’t.—What these studies are proving is that cholesterol protects from sepsis. The media keep saying that what is needed is a double-blind placebo controlled study, but they already have one they could talk about. It’s just that you can’t find out anything about it except that it was completed in January, 2008. You can read my take on statins and sepsis here.

#7. Statins Increase Pneumonia Risk: Just as for sepsis, the statin industry likes to claim that statins improve your chances against pneumonia. But a double-blind placebo controlled study proved them wrong. The risk for pneumonia that required hospitalization was increased by 61 percent in the statin group compared to the controls.

#8. WebMD Article on Muscle Pain and Weakness: This relatively benign article on WebMD provoked a firestorm of responses; each comment tells the story of another tragedy unfolding. To understand the biological mechanism behind the process by which statin drugs destroy muscles, see this link.—- Here’s a typical comment from that site—-“I was prescribed Crestor 20mg 2 weeks ago with cholesterol level 7.6. First time on any medication. After approx. 4 days I started to experience severe muscle pain, thigh, buttocks, arms, legs to the extent that I can hardly get out of bed in the morning. Have been back to Dr. who advised stopping tablets. Have been off them for 3 days, very little difference. I am hoping these pains will go away soon. I will never take a statin drug again – would rather take the healthy option, diet and exercise and take the risk. Have never felt so bad. Usually very healthy, fit person.”

#9. Statins and Heart Failure: Dr. Peter Langsjoen believes that statin drugs greatly increase your risk of heart failure. I have argued why this might be true here.

#10. JUPITER Trial and Diabetes: The JUPITER trial, which was terminated prematurely after less than two years, was widely heralded for showing that statins reduce the risk of heart attacks in the short term for people with high levels of C-reactive protein but without high cholesterol.—-However, little note was made of the fact that the JUPITER trial also showed a 25 percent increased risk to new-onset diabetes in the treatment group. Since diabetes is a strong risk factor for heart disease, one wonders how the trial would have turned out if it had been allowed to run to completion.

#11. High Cholesterol and Alzheimer’s: This is the article that inspired the Newsweek article, #12 below, with the lead story that statins “protect from” Alzheimer’s — which is the exact opposite of the truth about statins and Alzheimer’s.—-The only relationship between high cholesterol and Alzheimer’s the authors could find was if they looked back 30 years. What they’re not saying is that, in the intervening years, cholesterol levels fell for those who later developed Alzheimer’s. While no one has said exactly why their levels might have fallen, statin drugs are a good bet.

#12. Glowing Newsweek Article on Statins:This article illustrates how thoroughly the statin industry has succeeded in brainwashing the media into believing that black is white. The lead story is that statins protect against Alzheimer’s. If you have read my essay on statins and Alzheimer’s, you will think otherwise.