Tony Pantalleresco Radio show Notes For 18th of Jan 2014

Tony Pantallaresco

Welcome to Health access. Below we have Tony Pantalleresco Radio show Notes for 18th of Jan 2014

In this episode Tony covers :

Maple Tree– Composition of Pure Maple Syrup– Maple Wine

Prostate-what works for Protection and Healing

Obama Orders Massive Build-up Of Swarming Drones With Chemical Weapons

The Vinegar of the Four Thieves-4 thieves Vinegar– Original Recipe for Four Thieves Formula– Marseilles Vinegar or Four Thieves Vinegar

Essential Oil Formulary 4 Thieves

**************************************************************************
Maple Tree
Native Americans used the inner bark of Sugar Maple as an expectorant cough medicine and to benefit the lungs of runners. An infusion of the bark and the sap were both used for sore eyes and vision problems. Maple decoction was used for blood cleansing and skin disorders.—
Red Maple is also a source for maple syrup and medicine. As with Sugar Maple and other maples, the wash prepared from the bark was used by Native Americans for eye and skin problems. The bark infusion taken internally was used for cramps, menstrual disorders, diarrhea, sore back, hemorrhoids, and measles. Likewise, Silver Maple was used for skin problems, eye problems, coughs, etc.; and for syrup.–Box Elder was also used to make syrup, but I know of no one who has tried it. An infusion or decoction of the bark was used as an agent to induce vomiting (emetic). The wood was burned by Native Americans as incense and during ceremonies. Charcoal of the wood was used to make ceremonial face paint. The wood was also used to make prayer sticks and pipe stems.—
Striped Maple was used by Native Americans as medicine for lung and kidney troubles; and as an emetic, laxative, and general tonic. Mountain Maple was used for eye troubles, coughs and intestinal diseases. The roots were used as poultices for wounds and boiled into decoction for hemorrhoids.-In addition to syrup, the maple provides food from its bark and seeds. Native Americans would use the dried and powdered bark as a food by boiling into gruel, using as a thickener, or made into bread (with or without other flowers). (The Native Americans used many tree barks as food.) Maple seeds, which are found in the characteristic “helicopter” (samara), can also be made into flour. The seeds can also be eaten raw, boiled, or roasted.
Acer nigrum Michx. f.
Aceraceae, Tree
black maple (Eng.); érable noir (Fr.); ishig’omeaush’ (Ojibwa)
Inner bark: Decoction used for diarrhoea [Ojibwa: 84].
Acer pensylvanicum L.
Aceraceae, Tree
moosewood, striped maple (Eng.); érable de Pennsylvanie, bois barré, bois d’orignal (Fr.); mōn’zomĭsh’ (Ojibwa); onsé’gakuk (Abenaki)
Medicinal tea [Algonquin: 69].
Bark: Steeped and made into a poultice for swelling of the limbs [Algonquians: 63]. Used for gonorrhea, kidney troubles and for blood spitting [Mi’kmaq: 60]. Bark used for bronchial trouble [Abenaki: 67]. Decoction drunk as a laxative [91].
Inner bark: Boiled and taken as an emetic [Ojibwa: 84].
Acer rubrum L.
Aceraceae, Tree
red maple (Eng.); érable rouge (Fr.); cicigîme’wîc (Ojibwa)
Bark: Tea used to wash and cure sore eyes [91, Ojibwa: 87].
Acer saccharinum L.
Aceraceae, Tree
silver maple, soft maple, (Eng.); érable argenté (Fr.); innīnâ’tik, sigme-winš (Ojibwa)
Bark: Boiled and applied to sores [Ojibwa: 85]. Steeped and applied for chest pain [Mi’kmaq: 62].
Inner bark: Decoction used for diarrhoea, or mixed with a Betula decoction and used as a diuretic [Ojibwa: 84].
Acer saccharum Marsh.
Aceraceae, Tree
sugar maple (Eng.); érable à sucre (Fr.); a’nina’tĭg (Ojibwa)
Sap: Used as a tonic [55]. Used with a decoction of Caltha palustris as a cough syrup [Ojibwa: 88].
Bark: Used as a tonic or physic [91].
Acer spicatum Lam.
Aceraceae, Tree
mountain maple (Eng.); érable à épis (Fr.); malsuna’u (Malecite); cacagobi’mûk (Ojibwa); webanatuk (Atikamekw)
Branches: Pith put into the eye to remove foreign matter, or soaked in water to make a lotion for treating sore eyes [Ojibwa: 87].
Bark: Steeped in water and the water used to cure eyes [Malecite: 65].
Roots: Boiled and applied to wounds and abscess [Atikamekw: 73].

Composition of Pure Maple Syrup:

PPM= Mg/1000mls (liter)

Example would be 1600ppm = 1598.174400588 mg/litre–So 100 mls ( 3oz) 160mgs-per 28 mls(30 ml round it up) 1 oz=53.3 mgs

Carbohydrates (%):
Minerals (PPM)
Organic acids (%)
Amino Acids (PPM)
Vitamins (micrograms/liter)
Sucrose 62.65
Hexose (glucose, fructose) 0.5 – 3
Other trace sugars
Potassium 1500-2200
Calcium 400-1000
Magnesium 100-300
Phosphorus 50-125
Manganese 5-80
Zinc 5-50
Sodium 1-25
Iron 1-15
Tin 0-25
Copper 0-2
Malic 0.090
Citric 0.009
Succinic 0.007
Fumaric 0.004
Phenols 300-960
Amino nitrogens 30-190
Niacin (PP) 276
Pantothenic Acid (B5) 600
Riboflavin (B2) 60
Folic Acid Traces
Pyridoxine Traces
Biotin Traces
Vitamin A Traces

Maple Wine

From “Valuable Secrets”, 1809
“Boil 4, 5, or 6 gallons of sap according to its strength into one and add yeast according to the quantity you make. After it is fermented, set it aside in a cool place well stopped. If kept for two years, it will become a pleasant and round wine.”

Acer nigrum Michx. f.
Aceraceae, Tree
black maple (Eng.); érable noir (Fr.); ishig’omeaush’ (Ojibwa)
Inner bark: Decoction used for diarrhoea [Ojibwa: 84].
Acer pensylvanicum L.
Aceraceae, Tree
moosewood, striped maple (Eng.); érable de Pennsylvanie, bois barré, bois d’orignal (Fr.); mōn’zomĭsh’ (Ojibwa); onsé’gakuk (Abenaki)
Medicinal tea [Algonquin: 69].
Bark: Steeped and made into a poultice for swelling of the limbs [Algonquians: 63]. Used for gonorrhea, kidney troubles and for blood spitting [Mi’kmaq: 60]. Bark used for bronchial trouble [Abenaki: 67]. Decoction drunk as a laxative [91].
Inner bark: Boiled and taken as an emetic [Ojibwa: 84].
Acer rubrum L.
Aceraceae, Tree
red maple (Eng.); érable rouge (Fr.); cicigîme’wîc (Ojibwa)
Bark: Tea used to wash and cure sore eyes [91, Ojibwa: 87].
****************************************************************************
Prostate-what works for Protection and Healing

Ginger phytochemicals exhibit synergy to inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation.
Benefits of whole ginger extract in prostate cancer.

Aspirin use after a prostate cancer diagnosis and cancer survival in a prospective cohort..

The antitumor lignan Nortrachelogenin sensitizes prostate cancer cells

Oligomeric proanthocyanidin complexes (OPC) ( PINE)exert

Green tea polyphenols induce p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis in prostate cancer

Capsaicin, a component of red peppers, induces expression of androgen receptor via PI3K and MAPK pathways in prostate LNCaP cells.

Effect of capsaicin on prostate cancer cells.

A cohort study investigating aspirin use and survival in men with prostate cancer.

Polyphenols from the Mediterranean herb rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) for prostate cancer.

Carnosic acid modulates Akt/IKK/NF-κB signaling by PP2A and induces

Modulation of signaling pathways in prostate cancer by green tea polyphenols.

Ginger phytochemicals exhibit synergy to inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation.

Nutr Cancer. 2013;65(2):263-72

Authors: Brahmbhatt M, Gundala SR, Asif G, Shamsi SA, Aneja R

Abstract
Dietary phytochemicals offer nontoxic therapeutic management as well as chemopreventive intervention for slow-growing prostate cancers. However, the limited success of several single-agent clinical trials suggest a paradigm shift that the health benefits of fruits and vegetables are not ascribable to individual phytochemicals, rather may be ascribed to synergistic interactions among them. We recently reported growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing properties of ginger extract (GE) in in vitro and in vivo prostate cancer models. Nevertheless, the nature of interactions among the constituent ginger biophenolics, viz. 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, and 6-shogoal, remains elusive. Here we show antiproliferative efficacy of the most-active GE biophenolics as single-agents and in binary combinations, and investigate the nature of their interactions using the Chou-Talalay combination index (CI) method. Our data demonstrate that binary combinations of ginger phytochemicals synergistically inhibit proliferation of PC-3 cells with CI values ranging from 0.03 to 0.88. To appreciate synergy among phytochemicals present in GE, the natural abundance of ginger biophenolics was quantitated using LC-UV/MS. Interestingly, combining GE with its constituents (in particular, 6-gingerol) resulted in significant augmentation of GE’s antiproliferative activity. These data generate compelling grounds for further preclinical evaluation of GE alone and in combination with individual ginger biophenols for prostate cancer management.– PMID: 23441614 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Benefits of whole ginger extract in prostate cancer.

Karna P, Chagani S, Gundala SR, Rida PC, Asif G, Sharma V, Gupta MV, Aneja R.
Author information

Abstract

It is appreciated far and wide that increased and regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is linked with noteworthy anticancer benefits. Extensively consumed as a spice in foods and beverages worldwide, ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is an excellent source of several bioactive phenolics, including non-volatile pungent compounds such as gingerols, paradols, shogaols and gingerones. Ginger has been known to display anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiproliferative activities, indicating its promising role as a chemopreventive agent. Here, we show that whole ginger extract (GE) exerts significant growth-inhibitory and death-inductory effects in a spectrum of prostate cancer cells. Comprehensive studies have confirmed that GE perturbed cell-cycle progression, impaired reproductive capacity, modulated cell-cycle and apoptosis regulatory molecules and induced a caspase-driven, mitochondrially mediated apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells. Remarkably, daily oral feeding of 100 mg/kg body weight of GE inhibited growth and progression of PC-3 xenografts by approximately 56 % in nude mice, as shown by measurements of tumour volume. Tumour tissue from GE-treated mice showed reduced proliferation index and widespread apoptosis compared with controls, as determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemical methods. Most importantly, GE did not exert any detectable toxicity in normal, rapidly dividing tissues such as gut and bone marrow. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity of whole GE for the management of prostate cancer.

*********************************************************************

Capsaicin, a component of red peppers, induces expression of androgen receptor via PI3K and MAPK pathways in prostate LNCaP cells.

Malagarie-Cazenave S, Olea-Herrero N, Vara D, Díaz-Laviada I.
Author information

Abstract

In this study, capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) induced an increase in the cell viability of the androgen-responsive prostate cancer LNCaP cells, which was reversed by the use of the TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine, I-RTX and SB 366791. In further studies we observed that capsaicin induced a decrease in ceramide levels as well as Akt and Erk activation. To investigate the mechanism of capsaicin action we measured androgen (AR) receptor levels. Capsaicin induced an increase in the AR expression that was reverted by the three TRPV1 antagonists. AR silencing by the use of siRNA, as well as blocking the AR receptor with bicalutamide, inhibited the proliferative effect of capsaicin.

Effect of capsaicin on prostate cancer cells.

Díaz-Laviada I.
Author information

Abstract

In recent years, natural products have emerged as modulators of many cellular responses, with potential applications as therapeutic drugs in many disorders. Among them, capsaicin, the pungent agent in chili peppers, has been demonstrated to have a role as a tumor suppressor for prostate cancer. Capsaicin potently suppresses the growth of human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The antiproliferative activity of capsaicin correlates with oxidative stress induction and apoptosis. Capsaicin also induces ceramide accumulation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in androgen-resistant prostate cells. In androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells, capsaicin exerts a biphasic effect, promoting growth at low doses and inducing apoptosis at doses over 200 µM. This article will draw upon multiple lines of evidence to provide a comprehensive description on the current state of knowledge that implicates the effect of capsaicin on prostate cancer cells.

****************************************************************************

A cohort study investigating aspirin use and survival in men with prostate cancer.

Flahavan EM, Bennett K, Sharp L, Barron TI.
Author information

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Aspirin use has been associated with reduced mortality from cancer including prostate cancer in some studies. A number of anti-cancer mechanisms of aspirin have been proposed, including the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase enzymes, through which aspirin mediates both anti-platelet and anti-inflammatory activities. This cohort study examines associations between pre-diagnostic aspirin use (overall and by dose and dosing intensity) and mortality in men with localised prostate cancer.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Men with stage I-III prostate cancer were identified from Irish National Cancer Registry records, which have been linked to national prescribing data from the Irish General Medical Services scheme. Aspirin use in the year preceding prostate cancer diagnosis was identified from this linked prescription-claims data. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for associations between aspirin use and all-cause and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Associations between prescribed dose and dosing intensity were examined. The presence of effect modification by the type of treatment received and tumour characteristics was also assessed.

RESULTS:

Two thousand nine hundred and thirty-six men with a diagnosis of stage I-III prostate cancer (2001-2006) were identified (aspirin users, n = 1131). The median duration of patient follow-up was 5.5 years. In adjusted analyses, aspirin use was associated with a small, but non-significant, reduced risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.67-1.15). In dose-response analyses, stronger associations with prostate cancer-specific mortality were observed in men with higher aspirin dosing intensity (HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.51-1.05) and in men receiving >75 mg of aspirin[F1] (HR = 0.61, 95% CI 0.37-0.99). Analyses of effect modification by treatment type or tumour characteristics were non-significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Consistent with prior studies, aspirin use was associated with a non-significant reduced risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality in men with localised prostate cancer. Men receiving higher doses of aspirin had a statistically significant reduced risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality. These findings regarding an aspirin dose require further investigation

Aspirin use after a prostate cancer diagnosis and cancer survival in a prospective cohort.

Dhillon PK, Kenfield SA, Stampfer MJ, Giovannucci EL, Chan JM.
Author information

Abstract

Experimental and clinical data suggest that aspirin and other nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs may delay the progression of prostate cancer through inhibition of the COX pathway and its effects on cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis.[F2] Epidemiologic data support a reduced risk of prostate cancer incidence with aspirin use, yet no evidence exists about whether aspirin after diagnosis influences progression or survival. We conducted a prospective study of 3,986 participants of the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, with a prostate cancer diagnosis between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2005. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate the association between aspirin use after diagnosis and the development of metastases or fatal prostate cancer through January 31, 2008, adjusting for risk factors associated with incidence and mortality in this cohort, prediagnostic aspirin use, Gleason score, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, and primary treatment. In total, 265 men developed bony or other organ metastases or fatal prostate cancer during the 18 years of follow-up. We observed no association between updated aspirin use after diagnosis and lethal prostate cancer [tablets/week: <2: HR, 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-1.72; 2-5: HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.62-1.80; ≥ 6: HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.76-1.54; P(trend) = 0.99]. The results remained unchanged when we examined aspirin use at baseline only (P(trend) = 0.70) or frequency of use (d/wk; P(trend) = 0.35) or limited the outcome to fatal prostate cancer (P(trend) = 0.63). There was no association between aspirin use after a prostate cancer diagnosis and lethal disease in this cohort of prostate cancer survivors. ************************************************************************* Polyphenols from the Mediterranean herb rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) for prostate cancer. Petiwala SM, Puthenveetil AG, Johnson JJ. Author information Abstract The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits and vegetables and has been associated with a variety of health benefits including cancer prevention. One aspect of the diet that has not received enough attention is Mediterranean herbs. Specifically, rosemary and its polyphenolic diterpenes (carnosic acid and carnosol) are known to possess anti-oxidant activity that may be beneficial for cancer control. Herein, we describe the in vitro and in vivo studies carried out towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of carnosic acid and carnosol leading to inhibition of prostate cancer. The reported findings suggest that these polyphenols target multiple signaling pathways involved in cell cycle modulation and apoptosis. Further work is required to understand its potential for health promotion and potential drug discovery for prostate cancer chemoprevention. Carnosic acid modulates Akt/IKK/NF-κB signaling by PP2A and induces intrinsic and extrinsic pathway mediated apoptosis in human prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells. Kar S, Palit S, Ball WB, Das PK. Author information Abstract This study investigates the efficacy of carnosic acid (CA), a polyphenolic diterpene, isolated from the plant rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis), on androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. CA induced anti-proliferative effects in PC-3 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which was due to apoptotic induction as evident from flow-cytometry, DNA laddering and TUNEL assay. Apoptosis was associated with the activation of caspase-8, -9, -3 and -7, increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, release of cytochrome-c and decrease in expression of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family of proteins. Apoptosis was attenuated upon pretreatment with specific inhibitors of caspase-8 (Z-IETD-fmk) and caspase-9 (Z-LEHD-fmk) suggesting the involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic cascades[F3]. Further, apoptosis resulted from the inhibition of IKK/NF-κB pathway as evident from decreased DNA binding activity, nuclear translocation of p50 and p65 and IκBα phosphorylation. The down-regulation of IKK/NF-κB was associated with inhibition of Akt phosphorylation and its kinase activity with a concomitant increase in the serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity. Pharmacologic inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid and calyculin A, significantly reversed CA-mediated apoptotic events in PC-3 cells indicating that CA induced apoptosis by activation of PP2A through modulation of Akt/IKK/NF-κB pathway. In addition, CA induced apoptosis in another androgen refractory prostate cancer DU145 cells via intrinsic pathway as evidenced from the activation of caspase 3, cleavage of PARP, increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and cytochrome-c release. Carnosic acid, therefore, may have the potential for use in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. ************************************************************************* The antitumor lignan Nortrachelogenin sensitizes prostate cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death by inhibition of the Akt pathway and growth factor signaling. Peuhu E, Paul P, Remes M, Holmbom T, Eklund P, Sjöholm R, Eriksson JE. Author information Abstract Prostate cancer cells frequently develop resistance toward androgen-deprivation and chemotherapy. To identify new approaches to treat androgen-dependent prostate cancer, we have performed a structure-activity analysis of lignan polyphenols for cancer cell specific sensitization to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a death ligand that has ability to induce tumor-specific cell death. In this study, we report that the lignan nortrachelogenin (NTG) is the most efficient of the 27 tested lignan compounds in sensitizing prostate cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Importantly, pretreatment with NTG does not sensitize a non-malignant prostate cell line to TRAIL-induced cell death. The structural comparison of lignans reveals that the dibenzylbutyrolactone skeleton is required for the apoptosis-sensitizing activity, while substitutions at the aromatic rings do not seem to play a critical role in this lignan function. Our study also characterizes the cellular effects and molecular mechanisms involved in NTG anticancer activity. We previously reported that specific lignans inhibit the Akt survival-signaling pathway in concert with TRAIL sensitization. While NTG is also shown to be a effective inhibitor of Akt signaling, in this study we further demonstrate that NTG potently inhibits tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation in response to growth factors, such as insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Our results identify NTG as a novel agent for prostate cancer therapy with ability to inhibit Akt membrane localization and activity as well as the activation of growth factor receptors (GFRs), thereby efficiently synergizing with TRAIL exposure. Oligomeric proanthocyanidin complexes (OPC) ( PINE)exert anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on prostate cancer cells. Neuwirt H, Arias MC, Puhr M, Hobisch A, Culig Z. Author information Abstract BACKGROUND: Oligomeric proanthocyanidin complexes (OPC) are extracted from grape seeds or maritime pine bark and have been used for enhancement of capillary stability and lymphatic drainage. Since a role for OPC in cancer prevention was postulated, we asked whether they have an effect on prostate cancer cells. METHODS: Cell proliferation was determined by (3)H-thymidine assay and cell cycle status was analyzed on a flow cytometer. Expression of regulators of proliferation and apoptosis was determined by Western blot. RESULTS: We found that androgen-responsive cells LNCaP are more sensitive to OPC in terms of inhibition of proliferation in comparison to androgen receptor-negative PC3 or DU145 cells. Treatment with OPC resulted in a decrease in the percentage of LNCaP cells in the S phase and an increase in the percentage of cells in sub G1 phase. The anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect of OPC in the LNCaP cell line was associated with down-regulation of expression of the androgen receptor. Interestingly, similar regulatory effects of OPC, such as inhibition of expression of cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclins and stimulation of tumor suppressors p21 and p27, were seen in LNCaP and PC3 cells. Favorable changes in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio were observed in LNCaP and PC3 cells after the treatment with OPC. OPC caused an increase of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase p44 and p42, thus suggesting induction of cellular differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that OPC is a candidate that fulfills criteria for chemopreventive strategies in prostate cancer that might be established in following in vivo studies ************************************************************************** Green tea polyphenols induce p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells through two distinct mechanisms. Gupta K, Thakur VS, Bhaskaran N, Nawab A, Babcook MA, Jackson MW, Gupta S. Author information Abstract Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 is commonly observed in human prostate cancer and is associated with therapeutic resistance. We have previously demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTP) induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells irrespective of p53 status. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these observations remain elusive. Here we investigated the mechanisms of GTP-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells stably-transfected with short hairpin-RNA against p53 (LNCaPshp53) and control vector (LNCaPshV). GTP treatment induced p53 stabilization and activation of downstream targets p21/waf1 and Bax in a dose-dependent manner specifically in LNCaPshV cells. However, GTP-induced FAS upregulation through activation of c-jun-N-terminal kinase resulted in FADD phosphorylation, caspase-8 activation and truncation of BID, leading to apoptosis in both LNCaPshV and LNCaPshp53 cells. In parallel, treatment of cells with GTP resulted in inhibition of survival pathway, mediated by Akt deactivation and loss of BAD phosphorylation more prominently in LNCaPshp53 cells. These distinct routes of cell death converged to a common pathway, leading to loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cytochrome c release and activation of terminal caspases, resulting in PARP-cleavage. GTP-induced apoptosis was attenuated with JNK inhibitor, SP600125 in both cell lines; whereas PI3K-Akt inhibitor, LY294002 resulted in increased cell death prominently in LNCaPshp53 cells, establishing the role of two distinct pathways of GTP-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, GTP exposure resulted in inhibition of class I HDAC protein, accumulation of acetylated histone-H3 in total cellular chromatin, resulting in increased accessibility of transcription factors to bind with the promoter sequences of p21/waf1 and Bax, regardless of the p53 status of cells, consistent with effects elicited by an HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A. These results demonstrate that GTP induces prostate cancer cell death by two distinct mechanisms regardless of p53 status, thus identifying specific well-defined molecular mechanisms that may be targeted by chemopreventive and/or therapeutic strategies. Modulation of signaling pathways in prostate cancer by green tea polyphenols. Khan N, Mukhtar H. Author information Abstract Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy found in American men and the risk factors for PCa include age, family history, ethnicity, hormonal status, diet and lifestyle. For the successful development of cancer-preventive/therapeutic approaches, consumption of dietary agents capable of inhibiting or delaying the growth and proliferation of cancer cells without significantly affecting normal cells could be an effective strategy. Polyphenols derived from green tea, termed as green tea polyphenols (GTP) have received great attention in recent years for their beneficial effects, in particular, their significant involvement in cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. Several studies have reported beneficial effects of GTP using in vitro and in vivo approaches and in human clinical trials. Among green tea catechins, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is best studied for its cancer preventive properties. In this review article, we present available scientific literature about the effects of GTP and EGCG on signaling pathways in PCa. ************************************************************************* Obama Orders Massive Build-up Of Swarming Drones With Chemical Weapons Friday, January 3, 2014 8:54 The U.S. Department of Defence (DoD) revealed its Unmanned Systems Integrated Roadmap, setting out its technology aims for the next 25 years. Its plans include drone-bombs that can hunt in ‘swarms’ from a mothership.--Unmanned aircraft carrying stronger chemical weapons could also be on the horizon, the U.S. Department of Defence (DoD) revealed in its Unmanned Systems Integrated Roadmap.--While the document sets out plans for unmanned maritime, land and air vehicles, there is a lot of focus on the future capability of controversial drones, which, if the plans come to fruition, could deviate from mission commands set by humans if they spot a better target.--Current drones require intensive manpower on the ground to fly, which is expensive and the DoD plans on cutting costs by letting the machines make more decisions themselves, Live Science reported.--At the moment drones follow precise commands to complete a predetermined step-by-step mission, but the unmanned aircraft of the future could deviate from tasks, informed by ‘laws’ that govern their behaviour, laid out in algorithms and machine learning, as well as advanced sensors.---While drones, or unmanned aircraft, currently use GPS to navigate war zones and remote areas, the satellite signals used by the systems can be jammed easily, so the Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is working on jam-proof ‘inertial guidance systems’. The DoD’s roadmap also features plans for deadly ‘swarms’ of drone-bombs that are launched from an unmanned ‘mothership’ to circle the skies while a human operator searches for targets for the drones to crash into, guided by the bots’ on-board cameras. Thanks to the unmanned mothership, the kamikaze drones could have a range of over 250 nautical miles (463km) the roadmap said. The weapons dropped by more traditional drones are also set to get more deadly under the plans, as researchers are working on ‘energetic nanoparticles’ with a larger surface areas so that the chemicals within the ammunition reach faster and create a more powerful explosion. The technologies combined are intended to help the U.S. military be ‘more effective through greater automation and greater performance,’ the report says. A Dutch designer has penned the Drone Survival Guide, which like bird watching charts, shows the various shapes and sizes of flying objects by their silhouettes. Ruben Pater’s guide, however, details the differing kinds of flying robots used at war, as well as survival tips of how to hide from them. The majority of the drones selected for the chart are from NATO member countries, including the UK, France, Germany, U.S. and Canada. This is because these countries have used drones in wars such as Afghanistan and are also more transparent than some other countries in disclosing information about the robots, such as their wingspan. It uses a skull icon to show that a drone is used for attack and a little eye to denote a surveillance vehicle. The chart, which Mr Pater describes as ‘21st century bird watching’ shows the vast array of flying war machines used today from the giant 130ft wingspan of the Global Hawk drone to the petite Parrot AC quadcopter, which measures just 23 inches. He said: ‘Most drones are used today by military powers for remote-controlled surveillance and attack and their numbers are growing. ‘The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) predicted in 2012 that within 20 years there could be as many as 30.000 drones flying over U.S. soil alone. ‘As robotic birds will become commonplace in the near future, we should be prepared to identify them. This survival guide is an attempt to familiarise ourselves and future generations, with a changing technological environment.’ source – Daily Mail UK ************************************************************************* The Vinegar of the Four Thieves-4 thieves Vinegar During the horrendous times when the black death ravaged the old world and killed off thousands of people, there were some that mysteriously managed to avoid getting infected. The story goes that 4 brothers or friends had been going around stealing the belongings of those who were on their deathbeds or freshly deceased. At first, people did not pay much attention as they thought the thieves were fools. No doubt the black death would sooner or later get the better of them and make them pay for their sins with their lives. However, weeks went by, but this band of thieves still went about their dirty business seemingly unaffected. One day they were caught and although normally they would have faced the death sentence, they were promised their freedom if they revealed their secret of immunity. It turned out that they had inherited a secret herbal formula that was powerful enough to ward off the deadly disease. This formula has since then become known as 'The Vinegar of the Four Thieves'. By now there are many, slightly differing formulas that are circulating under that name. Here is one that should be quite effective: Thyme Rosemary Sage Rue Wormwood Tansy Handful of cloves Mix all ingredients and fill into a sterilized jar. Cover with cider vinegar and infuse for 4-6 weeks, strain. While this mixture is not poisonous, pregnant women should avoid it as it is very powerful. It is best to use preparation as an external disinfectant spray, do not use internally. ********************************************************************* Original Recipe for Four Thieves Formula Original Recipe for Four Thieves Formula 3 pints white wine vinegar handful wormwood handful meadowsweet handful juniper berries handful wild marjoram handful sage 50 cloves 2 oz. elecampane root 2 oz. angelica 2 oz. rosemary 2 oz. horehound 3 g camphor Marseilles Vinegar or Four Thieves Vinegar Marseilles Vinegar or Four Thieves Vinegar 40 g. greater wormwood, Artemesia absinthum 40 g. lesser wormwood, Artemesia pontica 40 g. rosemary 40 g. sage 40 g. mint 40 g. rue 40 g. lavender 5 g. calamus 5 g. cinnamon 5 g. clove 5 g. nutmeg 5 g. garlic 10 g. camphor (do not use synthetic camphor) 40 g. crystallized acetic acid 2500 g. white vinegar Instructions: steep the plants in the vinegar for 10 days. Force through a sieve. Add the camphor dissolved in the acetic acid, filter. ************************************************************************ Essential Oil Formulary 4 Thieves Recipe #1 40 drops of Clove Essential Oil 35 drops of Lemon Essential Oil 20 drops of Cinnamon Essential Oil 15 drops of Eucalyptus Essential Oil 10 drops of Rosemary Essential Oil Recipe #2 200 drops of Clove Oil (Syzgium aromaticum) 175 drops of Lemon Oil (Citrus Limon) 100 drops of Cinnamon Bark (Cinnamomum verum) 75 drops of Eucalyptus Oil (Eucalyptus radiata) 50 drops of Rosemary Oil (Rosmarinus officinalis) Recipe #3 1 tbs. Clove Essential Oil 1 tbs. Lemon Essential Oil 2 ½ tsp. Cinnamon Bark Essential Oil 2 tsp. Eucalyptus Essential Oil 2 tsp. Rosemary Essential Oil Recipe #4 2 tsp Clove Oil 1 1/2 tsp Lemon Oil 1 tsp Cinnamon Bark Oil 3/4 tsp Eucalyptus Oil 1/2 tsp Rosemary Oil TOP B [F1]75mgs minimal doseor higher [F2]Aspirin Stops and kills cancer in the prostate [F3]Apotosis =death of cancer cells ***************************************************************************************************************************************************************************