Tony Pantalleresco Radio Show notes – December 13th 2014

Tony Pantallaresco

Welcome to Tony Pantalleresco Radio Show notes – December 27 2014

In this weeks Show, Tony covers the following topics:

Polymorphism, bacteria inside us help dictate inflammation, antitumor activity

Terrestrosin D, a steroidal saponin from Tribulus terrestris L., inhibits growth and angiogenesis of human prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

Steroidal saponins from Tribulus terrestris—Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris linn on liver and kidney in cadmium intoxicated rats

Wild blueberries (bilberries) can help tackle adverse effects of high-fat diet

Creation of ‘rocker’ protein opens way for new smart molecules in medicine, other fields

Bad air means bad news for seniors’ brainpower

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Polymorphism, bacteria inside us help dictate inflammation, antitumor activity
Date:

December 20, 2014

Source:

The Wistar Institute

A common polymorphism — a variation in a person’s DNA sequence that is found with regularity in the general population — can lead to a chain of events that dictates how a tumor will progress in certain types of cancer, including a form of breast cancer as well as ovarian cancer, according to new research from The Wistar Institute that was published online by the journal Cancer Cell.–The research reveals a more explicit role about the symbiotic relationship humans have with the various bacteria that inhabit our body and their role during tumor progression.–“Our research indicates that interactions between the helpful bacteria in our bodies and immune cells at places situated away from tumors influence systemic responses in the host that alter how these tumors are able to progress,” said José Conejo-Garcia, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor and Program Leader in the Tumor Microenvironment and Metastasis Program at The Wistar Institute and lead author of the study.–Humans are colonized with trillions of bacteria — known as commensal bacteria because there are benefits to having these bacteria in our bodies — that inhabit the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts and our skin. [F1] These bacteria provide a first line of defense against infection. Recent research has found that interactions between these bacteria and the immune system are critical for providing important defenses against tumors occurring outside of the intestines.–[F2] In order for the immune system to recognize commensal as well as microscopic organisms that can cause disease — or pathogens — many of our cells are programmed to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns. At least 23% of the general public carries mutations in a group of pathogen recognition receptors called Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes. One of the most abundant polymorphisms, occurring in about 7.5% of the general population, or slightly more than one in fifteen people, which results in loss of function, is in TLR5. Although this polymorphism is found in completely healthy individuals, the people who do carry it are susceptible to illnesses such as Legionnaires disease, urinary tract infections, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Knowing that this variant could impact some immune responses, Wistar researchers set out to understand whether TLR5 signaling influences cancer.–The researchers found that TLR5 signaling influences certain types of cancer in different ways and is dependent upon the ability of the tumor to respond to interleukin 6 (IL-6), a small protein that can have both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory properties.

In individuals with functional TLR5 expression, commensal bacteria are able to stimulate IL-6 production, greater mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which in turn transform gamma delta T cells, a T cell subset that possesses innate-like properties, to produce high amounts of galectin-1, a protein that suppresses antitumor immune activity and hastens tumor progression.—However, the researchers also showed that TLR5 signaling does not always mean that tumors will grow faster. TLR5-deficient mice with tumors that produce low levels of IL-6 have faster tumor progression. In this instance, IL-17, another interleukin closely associated with autoimmune diseases and inflammation, is consistently found in higher levels in TLR5-deficient mice that have tumors, but IL-17 only accelerates cancer when the tumors are unresponsive to IL-6.—Researchers observed these phenomena were dependent upon commensal bacteria. When commensal bacteria were removed with antibiotics, the differences in TLR5-mediated tumor progression were not observed. The researchers noted that the differences in inflammation and progression of tumors are recapitulated in TLR5-responsive and unresponsive patients with ovarian and luminal breast cancer. The researchers performed a survival analysis using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) on patients for whom data on their TLR5 status was known.”Although independent sets of data and higher numbers of patients are needed, our data suggest that ovarian cancer reflects the evolution of IL-6-dependent tumors, while luminal breast cancer appears to become more aggressive in carriers of the polymorphism that abrogates TLR5 signaling,” Conejo-Garcia said.—[F3] For ovarian cancer, which is associated with high levels of IL-6, researchers found a significantly higher number of TLR5-deficient patients alive six years after their initial diagnosis compared with patients with TLR5, indicating a correlation between the absence of TLR5 and improved survival. For luminal breast cancer, which is associated with low levels of IL-6, the long-term survival prospects were worse for patients without TLR5.—Story Source-The above story is based on materials provided by The Wistar Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.—Journal Reference-Melanie R. Rutkowski, Tom L. Stephen, Nikolaos Svoronos, Michael J. Allegrezza, Amelia J. Tesone, Alfredo Perales-Puchalt, Eva Brencicova, Ximena Escovar-Fadul, Jenny M. Nguyen, Mark G. Cadungog, Rugang Zhang, Mariana Salatino, Julia Tchou, Gabriel A. Rabinovich, Jose R. Conejo-Garcia. Microbially Driven TLR5-Dependent Signaling Governs Distal Malignant Progression through Tumor-Promoting Inflammation. Cancer Cell, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.ccell.2014.11.009

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[F1]Glyphosates Destroy this bacteria opening everyone up to a variety or host of activity which can create all kinds of imbalances—with the added metals and biofilms as well from the chemtrails —you would be able to create a considerable overload and expedite the spread of anything to create the tumours-paracitical—viral—fungal and negative bacteria over load

[F2]This can refer to skin lesions as well

[F3]The reasons for different cancer activity in different regions what gets turned on and what gets turned off

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Terrestrosin D, a steroidal saponin from Tribulus terrestris L., inhibits growth and angiogenesis of human prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo.

Pathobiology. 2014;81(3):123-32

Authors: Wei S, Fukuhara H, Chen G, Kawada C, Kurabayashi A, Furihata M, Inoue K, Shuin T

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether terrestrosin D (TED) inhibits the progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and consider its mechanism.
METHODS: Cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. Caspase-3 activity and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion were detected by a caspase-3 assay and human vascular endothelial growth factor kit, respectively. A PC-3 xenograft mouse model was used to evaluate the anticancer effect of TED in vivo.
RESULTS: In vitro, TED strongly suppressed the growth of prostate cancer cells and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. TED induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in PC-3 cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). TED-induced apoptosis did not involve the caspase pathway. TED also decreased ΔΨm in PC-3 cells and HUVECs. In vivo, TED significantly suppressed tumor growth in nude mice bearing PC-3 cells, without any overt toxicity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed TED induced apoptotic cell death and inhibited angiogenesis in xenograft tumor cells.
CONCLUSION: Cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells and endothelial cells might be plausible mechanisms of actions for the observed antitumor and antiangiogenic activities of TED.—PMID: 24642631 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Make a tea –with the herb—or a tincture —getting this herb in the spring may increase testosterone production which can fortify heart as well as muscle in the body—later in the harvest term the chemistry will not be same—which will be beneficial for kidney function as well

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Steroidal saponins from Tribulus terrestris.
Kang LP1, Wu KL2, Yu HS2, Pang X3, Liu J4, Han LF4, Zhang J3, Zhao Y3, Xiong CQ3, Song XB4, Liu C3, Cong YW3, Ma BP5.

Author information
Abstract
Sixteen steroidal saponins, including seven previously unreported compounds, were isolated from Tribulus terrestris. The structures of the saponins were established using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. They were identified as: 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-2α,3β,22α,26-tetrol-12-one (terrestrinin C), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-22α,26-diol-3,12-dione (terrestrinin D), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-furost-4-en-22α,26-diol-3,6,12-trione (terrestrinin E), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-5α-furostan-3β,22α,26-triol-12-one (terrestrinin F), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-12β,22α,26-triol-3-one (terrestrinin G), 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-furost-4-en-22α,26-diol-3,12-dione (terrestrinin H), and 24-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-5α-spirostan-3β,24β-diol-12-one-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-d-galactopyranoside (terrestrinin I). The isolated compounds were evaluated for their platelet aggregation activities. Three of the known saponins exhibited strong effects on the induction of platelet aggregation

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Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris linn on liver and kidney in cadmium intoxicated rats.
Lakshmi GD1, Kumar PR, Bharavi K, Annapurna P, Rajendar B, Patel PT, Kumar CS, Rao GS.

Author information
Abstract
Administration of cadmium (Cd) significantly increased the peroxidation markers such as malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls along with significant decrease in antioxidant markers such as super oxide dismutase and reduced glutathione in liver and kidney tissues. Cadmium also caused a significant alteration in hepatic and renal functional markers in serum viz. total protein, albumin, alanine transaminase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. Prominent pathological changes observed in liver were severe vascular and sinusoidal congestion with diffuse degenerative changes and mononuclear infiltration into peripheral areas, while the kidney showed vascular and glomerular congestion, cloudy swelling of tubular epithelium. Coadministration of ethonolic extract of T. terrestris or vitamin E along with Cd significantly reversed the Cd induced changes along with significant reduction in Cd load.

take wheat germ oil or any oils that are high in E–alnond–sunflower-olive–and take the tincture or extract and blend together in equal parts for about 5 minutes this will fuse the 2 –and then use 1/2 – 1 tsp increments

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Wild blueberries (bilberries) can help tackle adverse effects of high-fat diet
Date:

December 18, 2014

Source:

University of Eastern Finland

Eating bilberries diminishes the adverse effects of a high-fat diet, according to a recent study at the University of Eastern Finland. For the first time, bilberries were shown to have beneficial effects on both blood pressure and nutrition-derived inflammatory responses.—Low-grade inflammation and elevated blood pressure are often associated with obesity-related diseases. The study focused on the health effects of bilberries on mice that were fed high-fat diet for a period of three months. Some of the mice were fed either 5% or 10% of freeze-dried bilberries in the diet. The researchers assessed the effects of the diets by looking at inflammatory cell and cytokine levels, systolic blood pressure, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and weight gain.–Mice on the high-fat diet experienced significant weight gain and detrimental changes in glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammation factors and blood pressure. Bilberries diminished the pro-inflammatory effects of the high-fat diet, indicated by an altered cytokine profile and a reduced relative prevalence of inflammation supporting T-cells. Bilberries also prevented elevated blood pressure caused by the high-fat diet.—Bilberries constitute an integral part of the Nordic diet and they could be better utilized also elsewhere in the world. Bilberries are associated with several beneficial health effects and their use involves plenty of traditional wisdom. The beneficial health effects of bilberries are thought to be explained by polyphenols, especially anthocyanins, the levels of which are significantly higher in bilberries than in commercially cultivated blueberries.–Story Source-The above story is based on materials provided by University of Eastern Finland. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.–

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Creation of ‘rocker’ protein opens way for new smart molecules in medicine, other fields
Date:

December 18, 2014

Source:

Dartmouth College

Gevorg Grigoryan, an assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth College, and researchers from other institutions have built the first artificial transporter protein that carries individual atoms across membranes, opening the possibility of engineering a new class of smart molecules with applications in fields as wide ranging as nanotechnology and medicine[F1] .—Human cells are protected by a largely impenetrable molecular membrane, but researchers have built the first artificial transporter protein that carries individual atoms across membranes, opening the possibility of engineering a new class of smart molecules with applications in fields as wide ranging as nanotechnology and medicine[F2] .–The study, which appears Dec. 19, in the journal Science, is a milestone in designing and understanding membrane proteins. The study was conducted by researchers from Dartmouth College, the University of California-San Francisco, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and National Institute of Science Educational and Research in India.–Each human cell is surrounded by a lipid membrane, a molecular barrier that serves to contain the cellular machinery and protect it from the surrounding elements. This cellular “skin” is impenetrable to most biological molecules but also presents a conundrum: if chemicals can’t get in or out, how is a cell to receive nutrients (food) and remove unwanted products of metabolism (trash)[F3] ? Nature has come up with an elegant solution to this logistical problem — transporter proteins (or transporters). These molecular machines are embedded in the cellular membrane and serve as gatekeepers, allowing specific chemicals to shuttle in and out when needed. Though biologists have known about transporters for many decades, their precise mechanism of action has been elusive.–The researchers set out to “build” an artificial transporter protein from scratch, to learn how transporters work, and to open the possibility of engineering a new class of smart molecules.
They developed new computational techniques to model the necessary molecular physics, enabling them to design a transporter protein through computer simulation. Specifically, computer simulations suggested which amino-acid building blocks should comprise the future transporter, so that it would carry ionic atoms of metal zinc in one direction across membranes, while pumping protons in the other. Using this computational blueprint, they created the molecule in the lab, referring to it as “Rocker” due to its predicted molecular dynamic properties: the protein was expected to “rock” between two alternating states, allowing it to drive atoms through.—“To our great excitement, experiments showed that Rocker did indeed transport zinc and protons and it did, in fact, rock between two states just as designed,” says co-lead author Gevorg Grigoryan, an assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth. “Further, Rocker showed great selectivity, not transporting ions of calcium, another design feature.”– Proteins are nature’s workhorse molecules, performing a great variety of tasks in the cell from catalysis and sensing to generation of mechanical work. Learning to design (from first principles) novel protein molecules to perform specific tasks would mean that the immense richness of function that proteins have to offer can be brought to bear in a variety of applications, from better therapeutics to smart materials and clean energy solutions.–“Our findings are an important step forward in this pursuit, demonstrating that through the use of computer simulations to orchestrate precise properties of atomic structure and molecular dynamics, proteins can now be designed to carry out complex functions that rival those of natural molecular machines,” Grigoryan says. “Further, our work represents a milestone in designing and understanding membrane proteins, a particularly challenging class of proteins.”Story Source–The above story is based on materials provided by Dartmouth College. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.–Journal Reference-N. H. Joh, T. Wang, M. P. Bhate, R. Acharya, Y. Wu, M. Grabe, M. Hong, G. Grigoryan, W. F. DeGrado. De novo design of a transmembrane Zn2 -transporting four-helix bundle. Science, 2014; 346 (6216): 1520 DOI: 10.1126/science.1261172

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[F1]This is horrendously dangerous —this will effect environmental settings—these protens will get out into the field just like Genetics and other nano components but with a protein delivery system the natural protection in the field whether environmental—human-aquatic-mammalian or reptilian will all be impacted—with a vaccine the nano delivery method which is already being utilized is showing high levels of affliction—this has become an experiment —using humans as a guinea pig

[F2]Anyone seeing the connection here with smart dust tech and ligand or protein binding agents—and there already effect on the environment

[F3]That is the nature of defence against viral or fungal or bacterial invaders—when the barrier is penetrated with nano then it has no defence and becomes a re written cell and saturated with nano particles

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Bad air means bad news for seniors’ brainpower

Date-November 16, 2012

Source-The Gerontological Society of America

Living in areas of high air pollution can lead to decreased cognitive function in older adults, according to new research presented in San Diego at The Gerontological Society of America’s (GSA) 65th Annual Scientific Meeting.–This finding is based on data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Health and Retirement Study. The analysis was conducted by Jennifer Ailshire, PhD, a National Institute on Aging postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Biodemography and Population Health and the Andrus Gerontology Center at the University of Southern California.–“As a result of age-related declines in health and functioning, older adults are particularly vulnerable to the hazards of exposure to unhealthy air,” Ailshire said. “Air pollution has been linked to increased cardiovascular and respiratory problems, and even premature death, in older populations, and there is emerging evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution may have adverse effects on brain health and functioning as well.”–This is the first study to show how exposure to air pollution influences cognitive function in a national sample of older men and women. It suggests that fine air particulate matter — composed of particles that are 2.5 micrometers in diameter and smaller, thought to be sufficiently small that if inhaled they can deposit deep in the lung and possibly the brain — may be an important environmental risk factor for reduced cognitive function.–The study sample included 14,793 white, black, and Hispanic men and women aged 50 and older who participated in the 2004 Health and Retirement Study (a nationally representative survey of older adults). Individual data were linked with data on 2004 annual average levels of fine air particulate matter from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Quality System monitors across the country. Cognitive function was measured on a scale of 1 to 35 and consisted of tests assessing word recall, knowledge, language, and orientation.–Ailshire discovered that those living in areas with high levels of fine air particulate matter scored poorer on the cognitive function tests. The association even remained after accounting for several factors, including age, race/ethnicity, education, smoking behavior, and respiratory and cardiovascular conditions.–Fine air particulate matter exposures ranged from 4.1 to 20.7 micrograms per cubic meter, and every ten point increase was associated with a 0.36 point drop in cognitive function score. In comparison, this effect was roughly equal to that of aging three years; among all study subjects, a one-year increase in age was associated with a drop 0.13 in cognitive function score.–Story Source-The above story is based on materials provided by The Gerontological Society of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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