Health News Update 06/04/2013

in-the-news
As the weeks slide by and the days start to get longer here in the UK, the cold weather just will not leave! There is lots of Health news to keep you busy in the warm! As usual some of the news is worrying, some is interesting and some will educate. Take what you need and what you can use. Here are some of the health related news that I liked.

Low vitamin B increases inflammation and causes oxidative stress: Eat these foods to boost your levels
NaturalNews) Researchers at Tuft University in Boston, Massachusetts, conducted a study entitled “Association of vitamin B-6 status with inflammation, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammatory conditions: the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study.”

It was called the Boston Puerto Rican study because the researchers used 1,205 ethnic Puerto Rican elders living in the Boston area who exhibit a higher rate of depression and cognitive impairment as well as hypertension, obesity, and Type II diabetes than non-Hispanic or Hispanic groups.

Vitamin B6 deficiency has already been loosely associated by observing low B6 concentrations among those with cardiovascular disease (CVD). But the medical field has suspected the resultant higher homocysteine levels as a major factor for CVD.

The Boston researchers noticed DNA oxidative markers remained high from lower B6 concentrations even after homocysteine was neutralized.

So they decided that low vitamin B6 concentrations are associated with inflammation and oxidative stress by lowering glutathione’s protective antioxidant properties. Vitamin B6 is needed to help produce sufficient cysteine as a glutathione precursor.

Glutathione is considered the master antioxidant by many experts. (http://www.naturalnews.com/028570_glutathione_GSH.html)

From their report: “Our data suggest that vitamin B-6 may influence cardiovascular disease risk through mechanisms other than homocysteine and support the notion that nutritional status may influence the health disparities present in this population.” (Emphasis added)

Vitamin B6 and the B-Complex

Vitamin B6 is one of the eight B vitamins of B complex. Each one has an independent but coexisting function. Vitamin B6 or pyridoxine is involved with with metabolizing amino acids and the synthesis of neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine in addition to the sleep hormone melatonin.

Vitamin B6 also helps vitamin B12 produce red blood cells. It also manages to convert non carbohydrate sources, such as proteins and lipids, into glucose for cellular metabolic energy.

Foods high in vitamin B6 and other B vitamins include brewers yeast, bee pollen, bell peppers, mushrooms, turnip greens, summer squash, tuna, cod, turkey or chicken, and all the other cruciferous vegetables, such as kale, broccoli, and cauliflower.

Supplementing B6 should not exceed 200 mg, while 100 mg is usually adequate. Any high dose single B vitamin should include most or all of the other B vitamins in with complementary normal doses, as they have an interdependent synergy. Many B-complex supplements contain almost all or all the B vitamins:

Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)

Vitamin B3 (niacin or niacinamide)

Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, or pyridoxine hydrochloride)

Vitamin B7 (biotin)

Vitamin B9 (folic acid is the synthetic form; folate is the natural form that many consider healthier for human consumption)

Vitamin B12 (various cobalamins are used in supplements, but methylcobalamin is the best)

Sometimes it’s necessary to beef up on one of them more than the others depending on the person’s health needs. Three common examples are vitamin B12, folate or folic acid, and niacin.

Vitamin B12 is important for mental and overall energy, but it has a hard time getting by the gut unless you’re eating lots of meat. If not, sublingual tablets and B12 patches work well if you in lieu of injections. Make sure you stick with methylcobalamin B12 sources.

You can supplement with folate instead of folic acid if your dietary intake is inadequate. Look for products that contain the Metfolin brand, or list “5-methyltetrahydrofolate” or “5-MTHF” on the label or say folate. Watch out with multivitamins. They usually contain folic acid.

Niacin is the basis of Orthomolecular Psychiatry’s mega-vitamin solutions to mental disorders. And it can be used along with induced heavy sweating to blow apart lipids for detox and/or weight loss.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/38782

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2806890/

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=108

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_vitamins

http://chriskresser.com/folate-vs-folic-acid

http://www.naturalnews.com/031940_mental_acuity_Alzheimers.html

http://www.naturalnews.com/033168_niacin_detoxification.html

Mycotoxins: The Hidden Hormone Danger In Our Food Supply

Over 30 years ago, scientists observed mycotoxin contaminated animal feed (grains) interfering with normal sexual development in young female pigs, resulting in estrogenic syndromes and precocious puberty. Recent human research in the U.S. is now confirming that the contamination of our food supply with fungal toxins is adversely affecting the sexual development of young girls.

Grains, once considered the foundation of the USDA’s food pyramid, have recently come under scrutiny due to their purported evolutionary incompatibility (e.g. Paleodiet), their co-option by biotech and agricultural corporations (e.g. Monsanto’s Franken-Corn), as well as the fact that they convert to “sugar” within the body, to name but a few of a growing list of concerns. But there may be a more underlying problem affecting all grains, including both organic and conventional varieties, that Nature herself produces, and it goes by the name of Mycotoxins.

What Are Mycotoxins?
Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by organisms of the fungi kingdom, commonly known as molds. If you eat grains, or grain-fed animal products, there is a good chance you are already being exposed because mold infestation and mycotoxin contamination affects as much as one-quarter of the global food and feed supply.[i]

Food contaminated with mycotoxins can cause acute, even life-threatening adverse health effects. As recently as April 2004, in Kenya, an outbreak of aflatoxicosis, caused by aflatoxin contamination in corn, resulted in 317 cases and 125 deaths.[ii] When samples of the corn were evaluated for levels of aflatoxin, 55% of the maize products tested had aflatoxin levels greater than the Kenyan regulatory limit of 20 parts per billion, ranging from 100 ppb (35%) to 1 part per million (7%).

While it is remarkable that these exceedingly low concentrations can have deadly effects, the absence of acute signs and symptoms of mycotoxin poisoning does not necessarily mean you are not being affected. Indeed, much lower, harder to detect, concentrations of various mycotoxins are capable of profoundly disrupting endocrine function in exposed population, likely contributing subclinically to many other chronic degenerative health conditions.

Mycotoxins As Endocrine Disruptors
A groundbreaking study published in the journal The Science of Total Environment in 2011 found that the estrogen-disrupting mycotoxin known as zearalenone (ZEA), produced by the microscopic fungus Fusarium graminearum, was detectable in the urine of 78.5% of New Jersey girls sampled, and that these Zea-positive girls, aged 9 and 10 years, “tended to be shorter and less likely to have reached the onset of breast development.”[iii]

ZEA mycotoxins originate in grains such as corn, barley, oats, wheat, rice and sorghum,[iv] but also travel up the food chain to grain-fed meat, eggs and dairy products, and are even found in beer. Indeed, the researchers were able to find an association between the young girls’ urinary levels of ZEA and their intake of commonly contaminated sources such as beef and popcorn.

Interestingly, derivatives of ZEA mycotoxin have been patented as oral contraceptives. Also, according to a recent article “[zearalenone] has been widely used in the United States since 1969 to improve fattening rates in cattle by increasing growth rate and feed conversion efficiency. Evidence of human harm from this practice is provided by observations of central precocious puberty. As a result, this practice has been banned by the European Union.” Other research has confirmed the link between mycotoxins and premature puberty.

Pigs fed zearalenone contaminated corn fed pigs has resulted in estrogenic syndromes including uterine enlargement, swelling of the vulva and mammary glands, and pseudopregnancy, according to research published over 30 years ago.

Molecular research on ZEA’s endocrine disruptive properties indicate that it has much higher estrogen receptor binding affinity, when compared nanogram to nanogram, than found in other well-known endocrine disruptors, such as DDT and bisphenol A, in both estrogen receptor subtypes.[v] Also, healthy human intestinal microflora have been shown incapable of degrading zearalenone, unlike bisphenol A. [vi]

Surprisingly, the ZEA study in young NJ girls was the first ever performed to evaluate this mycotoxin’s potential estrogen-disrupting properties, and indicates just how great a need there is for further research on the topic, as far as public health is concerned. There are already over 40 mycotoxins of great enough concern to be subject to regulation by over 100 countries.[vii] And yet, most of these have not been fully characterized or evaluated for their potential health risks.

What Can We Do About The Mycotoxin Problem?
Unfortunately, both conventional and organic grain products are equally susceptible to mycotoxin contamination.[viii] Also, cooking mycotoxin contaminated grains does not appear to reduce their concentrations. The solution, therefore, may require shifting away from cereal grains, altogether – especially those that are not fresh, i.e. corn on the cob. Due to the fact that much of the U.S. corn supply is contaminated with agrichemicals such as glyphosate, the primary herbicide ingredient within Roundup, and has been altered with recombinant DNA technology to contain potentially harmful transgenes, kicking the corn habit may not be so difficult. However, our infatuation with other susceptible grains, such as wheat, may be harder to kick.

One of the best approaches to modifying the diet to exclude mold-susceptible grains is to focus on low-starch, high-nutrient vegetables such as kale instead, and choosing fresh produce instead of consuming more shelf stable, but mycotoxin rich, processed grain-based products.

Also, garlic has been studied to be capable of reducing the adverse effects of zearalenone toxicity, indicating that it would be an excellent seasoning to use if one were to consume potentially contaminated grains or grain-derived products of any kind. In fact, it is likely that the near universal use of spices within world culinary traditions may, in part, be due to their role in reducing adverse health effects associated with mycotoxins and related food-borne pathogens.

Resources
[i] USDA.gov, International Trade and Food Safety, Chapter 6, Mycotoxin Hazards and Regulations, Erik Dohlman
[ii] Lauren Lewis, Mary Onsongo, Henry Njapau, Helen Schurz-Rogers, George Luber, Stephanie Kieszak, Jack Nyamongo, Lorraine Backer, Abdikher Mohamud Dahiye, Ambrose Misore, Kevin DeCock, Carol Rubin, . Aflatoxin contamination of commercial maize products during an outbreak of acute aflatoxicosis in eastern and central Kenya. Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Dec ;113(12):1763-7. PMID: 16330360
[iii] Elisa V Bandera, Urmila Chandran, Brian Buckley, Yong Lin, Sastry Isukapalli, Ian Marshall, Melony King, Helmut Zarbl. Urinary mycoestrogens, body size and breast development in New Jersey girls. Full Free Text. Sci Total Environ. 2011 Oct 3. Epub 2011 Oct 3. PMID: 21975003
[iv] INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME ON CHEMICAL SAFETY review on Zearalenone
[v] G G Kuiper, J G Lemmen, B Carlsson, J C Corton, S H Safe, P T van der Saag, B van der Burg, J A Gustafsson. Interaction of estrogenic chemicals and phytoestrogens with estrogen receptor beta. Endocrinology. 1998 Oct ;139(10):4252-63. PMID: 9751507
[vi] Akiyama, H., Toyoda, M., Kato, M., Igimi, S. & Kumagai, S. (1997) The degradation of several mycotoxins by human intestinal microflora cultured by continous flow culture system. Mycotoxins, 44, 21-27.
[vii] Hans P van Egmond, Ronald C Schothorst, Marco A Jonker. Regulations relating to mycotoxins in food: perspectives in a global and European context. Anal Bioanal Chem. 2007 Sep ;389(1):147-57. Epub 2007 May 17. PMID: 17508207
[viii] Carlo Brera, Carla Catano, Barbara de Santis, Francesca Debegnach, Marzia de Giacomo, Elena Pannunzi, Marina Miraglia. Effect of industrial processing on the distribution of aflatoxins and zearalenone in corn-milling fractions. J Agric Food Chem. 2006 Jul 12 ;54(14):5014-9. PMID: 16819910

Discover a safe alternative to mammography and prevent cancer – naturally

NaturalNews) Has your family doctor or GYN ever talked to you about “breast thermography”? This is a simple, non-invasive way of accessing your risk for breast cancer – yet most conventionally-trained physicians have no idea about its benefits. Although a surprising fact to most people, medical thermography has been around since the 1970’s and approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1982 for breast cancer detection and risk assessment – as an adjunct to mammography.

Unfortunately, the medical establishment; the American Cancer Society (ACS) and most women’s organizations only push for mammography – which, due to radiation exposure, only increases your risk for breast cancer with every test. Find out how to prevent breast cancer – years before conventional testing procedures – by understanding the value of breast thermography and natural healthcare solutions.

Visit: http://www.naturalhealth365.com and enter your email for FREE show details + a FREE gift!

What is the difference between mammography and thermography?

According to Moshe Dekel, M.D., board certified in GYN and a specialist in breast thermography – “the difference between the two modalities is profound.”

“Mammography, like MRI and sonography, is an anatomical study; it looks at anatomical changes of the breast tissue. It may take up to ten years for the tumor to grow to a sufficient size to be detectable by either a mammogram or a physical examination. By that time, the tumor has achieved more than 25 doublings of the malignant cell colony and may have already metastasized.”

Do we really want to wait that long? And, do we really want to expose ourselves to all that radiation?

Dr. Dekel goes on to say, “thermography is a physiological study. The infrared camera detects the heat (infrared radiation), which is emitted by the breast without physical contact with it (no compression) and without sending any signal (no radiation).”

“Thermography shows small, unilateral temperature increases, which are caused by an increased blood supply to cancer cells. Cancer cells have an ability to create new blood vessels to the affected area (neoangiogenesis) in order to satisfy the increased demand for nutrients resulting from the higher rate of growth and metabolic demands of the new colony.”

Scientific proof that mammograms are ineffective at preventing breast cancer

Back in 2000, a large, long-term Canadian study found that an annual mammogram was no more effective in preventing deaths from breast cancer than periodic physical examinations for women in their 50’s. Half of the almost 40,000 women, ages 50 to 59, received periodic breast examinations alone and half received breast examinations plus mammograms. All learned to examine their own breasts as well.

By 1993, 13 years after the study began, there were 610 cases of invasive breast cancer and 105 deaths in the women who received only breast examinations, compared with 622 invasive breast cancers and 107 deaths in those who received breast examinations and mammograms.

Let’s be honest – mammograms do more harm, than good. Their ionizing radiation mutates cells, and the mechanical pressure on the breast increases the risk of spreading (undiscovered) cancer cells throughout the body. Want more scientific proof?

In 1995, the British medical journal, The Lancet, reported that since mammographic screening was introduced in the 1970’s, the incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which represents 12 percent of all breast cancer cases, had increased by 328 percent and that 200 percent of this increase was due to the use of mammography.

Here’s an interesting fact – 80 percent of the 1.6 million breast biopsies performed each year in the United States, because of a suspicious mammography, are negative. So why does conventional medicine keep pushing this ineffective test? The answer is clear – the conventional cancer industry is a multi-billion dollar business where profits are more important than people.

Don’t become a statistic of the dumbed-down, conventional medical system. Modern medicine is only concerned with “managing” disease. On the next NaturalNews Talk Hour, Jonathan Landsman invites you to learn about how to prevent, even reverse breast cancer – naturally!

Visit: http://www.naturalhealth365.com and enter your email for FREE show details + a FREE gift!

This week’s guest: Moshe Dekel, M.D., Board Certified GYN

Learn about Thermography and Dr. Dekel’s cancer prevention program

Moshe Dekel, M.D. is a board-certified GYN – specializing in breast thermography, bio-identical hormone replacement and helping people recover from emotional stress issues, like anxiety and insomnia – to name a few.

Since 2000, when he stopped performing surgeries and deliveries, Dr. Dekel has focused his efforts on helping his patients, both men and women, achieve better health using functional medicine, bio identical hormones, nutritional counseling and nutritional supplementation.

Find out how to prevent breast cancer – years before conventional testing procedures – by understanding the value of breast thermography and natural healthcare solutions.

MCT Fats Found In Coconut Oil Boost Brain Function In Only One Dose

Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs), the primary type of fat found within coconut oil, have been found to boost cognitive performance in older adults suffering from memory disorders as serious as Alzheimer’s — and not after months or even days of treatment, but after a single dose!

A groundbreaking 2004 study published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging found that the administration of medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), the primary fat type found in coconut oil, almost immediately improved cognitive function in older adults with memory disorders.

The study involved 20 subjects with Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment who, on separate days, were given either emulsified MCTs or a placebo. The researchers observed a significant increase in blood plasma levels of the ketone body beta-hydroxylutyrate (beta-OHB) after only 90 minutes of treatment, and depending on the apolipoprotein E genotype of the subject tested, beta-OHB levels either continued to rise or held constant between the 90 and 120 minute blood draws in the treatment condition. Remarkably, cognitive testing revealed that this brief MCT treatment facilitated improved performance on the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-cog) in 4 subjects within the study group. Moreover, “higher ketone values were associated with greater improvement in paragraph recall with MCT treatment relative to placebo across all subjects (P=0.02).”[i]

How Medium Chain Triglycerides Work

How could a single dose of MCTs cause an almost immediate improvement in cognitive performance in those suffering from cognitive impairments as serious as Alzheimer’s disease? The explanation is found both in the unique metabolic needs of the brain and in the configuration of MCTs themselves. Whereas the primary fuel source for the energy-hungry brain is glucose, when insulin resistance and suboptimal metabolism (hypometabolism) develops in the brain, both the brain’s structure and function are compromised. Ketone bodies provide a much needed alternative fuel source to glucose that can recharge metabolic processes within the brain, resulting in an almost immediate improvement in cognitive function.

MCTs are not like most fats we consume. For instance, due to their smaller size they do not form micelles and are not stored in adipose tissue. Whereas up to 97% of the dietary fats we ingest are made up of long-chain triglycerides (LCTs) which have been 14 and 18 carbons,[ii] MCTs have relatively shorter chain lengths of 5 to 12 carbons, making them easier to absorb and utilize. They are preferentially oxidized by the liver, and when provided in large enough quantities, they give rise to ketone bodies.[iii]

What is the best way to take MCTs? As we are advocates of whole food nutrition, coconut oil is our preferred source of these triglycerides, containing approximately 2/3rds MCTs by volume. Coconut oil also has a broad spectrum of other health benefits, which we highlighted in our previous article “13 Evidence-Based Medicinal Properties of Coconut Oil.”

Also, instead of treating coconut oil or MCTs as some new nutraceutical “magic bullet,” almost as if we are just loading natural bullets into the same old outdated allopathic gun, try incorporating it into your diet in a way that displaces less healthy fats. For instance, replace that rancid, pro-inflammatory ‘vegetable oil’ (e.g. soy, grape seed, peanut, canola oil) you are using to fry an egg or bake with, with sublimely saturated, rancidity-resistant coconut oil.

Or, enjoy a delicious curry with coconut milk as a base. Because 25% of coconut milk is fat, and about 66% of that fat is MCT, you are still getting a healthy dose. It is always better to eat smaller amounts of truly therapeutic foods, enjoyed in the context of sharing, preparing and enjoying good food, so that you will ideally never have to use the heroic “food as medicine” approach after a serious disease has had the opportunity to set in. Think: use food so that medicine never becomes necessary.

For additional information view the testimonial of Dr. Mary Newport who discovered the benefits of using coconut oil to treat her husband’s Alzheimer’s Disease.

Resources
[i] Mark A Reger, Samuel T Henderson, Cathy Hale, Brenna Cholerton, Laura D Baker, G S Watson, Karen Hyde, Darla Chapman, Suzanne Craft. Effects of beta-hydroxybutyrate on cognition in memory-impaired adults. Neurobiol Aging. 2004 Mar;25(3):311-4. PMID: 15123336
[ii] Anonymous: Medium chain triglycerides. Alt Med Rev 2002, 7:418-420.
[iii] Lauren C Costantini, Linda J Barr, Janet L Vogel, Samuel T Henderson. Hypometabolism as a therapeutic target in Alzheimer’s disease. BMC Neurosci. 2008 ;9 Suppl 2:S16. Epub 2008 Dec 3. PMID: 1909098