Health Axis News Round Up 29 December 2012

Health Axis

This weeks health news has come thick and fast even over the festive period.

Tony Pantalleresco (The Remedy) is now finding time to post on the blog and kept putting on his radio show on ‘The Micro Effect’ network and Tony has posted show notes to the show that aired live on the 24th of December (Christmas Eve). his dedication knows no bounds!

I will start making some posts and asking Tony to reply and give his opinion to them. This will help make the blog more interactive. We have been getting many comments recently… but only from people trying to sell handbags made in china!!!

I haven’t been doing too much health news reading over the last week as I have been busy seeing family and enjoying the Festive season but here are a couple of stories I thought was worth sharing:

  •  Intestinal flora shown to fight disease such as HIV

  • Researchers testing promising, non-pharmaceutical Alzheimer’s treatment

 

Intestinal flora shown to fight disease such as HIV

NaturalNews) As we approach the winter months, more and more people will come down with all types of illness. Chances are you have already seen people coming down with colds and possibly even the flu. And similar to most people, maybe you are fearful because you don’t want to become another winter time flu statistic. Well, studies and research have shown that proper intestinal flora will equip you with a healthier immune system.
When babies are born, they have a very susceptible immune system. Because they are still developing aspects of themselves, such as their frontal lobes and intestinal lining, their immune systems lack the sufficiency an adult may have. A crucial factor in developing an immune system is proper intestinal strength and health. This can be achieved through intestinal flora eubiosis. This means an individual has all of the essential microflora that enable them to flourish. The “gut” flora have been linked to improving CD4+ T cell numbers, as well as inhibiting their depletion. This translates into stronger immune responses and immunity in general. Our intestinal lining is one of, if not the most important barriers we have against infection and disease. If this barrier is damaged or not functioning like it should be, we are susceptible to many different problems. In fact, research has shown that in HIV-1 ridden patients, increasing microflora, diminishes the speed of the virus as well as some of the concomitant infections the virus contributes to.

Further, flora has been linked to providing anti-inflammatory properties to individuals with auto-immunity. It is known that individuals suffering from autoimmune diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis and Crohn’s disease have significantly increased levels of inflammation in their systems. This provides a rationale in using “probiotics” to help combat these diseases, due to the diseases’ pro-inflammatory natures. Not to mention there is significant research that is now being presented dealing with micro-mimicry reactions due to intestinal fortitude discrepancies. This meaning, autoimmune reactions caused by the body attacking allergenic particles that “leak” into it due to dysfunctional “guts.” When combing both concepts, you can see why intestinal health, specifically proper floral counts may contribute to the prevention of varying forms of disease. At the very least we can agree that intestinal health is a key contributor to providing a proper immune response toward sickness and disease.

So before you stand in line to receive your flu shot, ask yourself if you have provided your body the proper nutrients and supplies that it needs in order to properly defend you against disease.
Sources: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23196853
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23196853
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22292110
About the author:
Joseph Bova is a student doctor at the Palmer College of Chiropractic Student Clinic in Port Orange, FL. He is also pursuing a Diplomate in Functional Neurology from the Carrick Institue for Graduate Studies. Joe is versed in both functional nutrition and medicine. As a student doctor Joe has helped patients with neurological disorders such as Parkinson”s Disease, Huningtons Chorea, Cervical Dystonia, ADD/ADHD, and Autism. Joe has also helped people with more common issues such as; acid reflux, hypertension, gastrointestinal issues, thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, head aches, back pain and much more. You can follow Joe on twitter at BovaJoe, or on his blog at BovaHealthandWellness.com.

Researchers testing promising, non-pharmaceutical Alzheimer’s treatment

NaturalNews) Researchers at Johns Hopkins University are carrying out clinical tests in which a pacemaker-like device is implanted into the brains of patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.

“We are very excited about the possibilities of this potentially new way to treat Alzheimer’s,” said lead researcher Constantine G. Lyketsos.

Alzheimer’s is an incurable, degenerative disease that leads to progressive loss of cognitive function, including memory and the ability to perform simple daily tasks. An estimated 5.2 million people over the age of 64 currently suffer from Alzheimer’s disease in the United States, and this number is project triple by 2050.

Although researchers have searched effective pharmaceutical treatments for years, none have yielded any promise. The new multi-center trial is designed to test a completely different model of treatment, in which electrical stimulation is delivered directly to the brain in order to slow and even reverse cognitive decline.

“Recent failures in Alzheimer’s disease trials using drugs such as those designed to reduce the buildup of beta amyloid plaques in the brain have sharpened the need for alternative strategies,” said Paul B. Rosenberg, director the Johns Hopkins University site for the study.

“This is a very different approach, whereby we are trying to enhance the function of the brain mechanically. It’s a whole new avenue for potential treatment for a disease becoming all the more common with the aging of the population.”

Deep brain stimulation

The device consists of a tiny, pacemaker-like stimulator that sends 130 electrical impulses per second through wires that are implanted in the brain’s fornixes. The fornix is essential in transmitting information to the hippocampus, a structure believed to play an important role in memory synthesis and learning. In many early stage Alzheimer’s patients, the first symptoms appear in the hippocampus. The electrical current is not detectable by the patient, Rosenberg said.

These “deep brain stimulation” devices have already been in use for 15 years in patients with Parkinson’s disease, another neurodegenerative disorder. More than 80,000 people have received the implants, which appear to reduce the incidence of tremors and the need for medication. Other studies are underway to determine whether deep brain stimulation can effectively treat obsessive-compulsive disorders or depression.

In a preliminary study conducted in 2010, researchers found that patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease who received the devices experienced sustained increases in glucose metabolism over a 13-month period, whereas the typical course of the disease is for glucose metabolism to decrease. Glucose metabolism is an indicator of nerve cell activity.

The new study will be conducted on 40 patients at five institutions across the United States and Canada. Half the participants will have their devices activated two weeks after surgery, while the other half will have their devices activated one year after surgery. The study is double-blind, meaning that neither doctors nor patients will know which group each participant is in.
The study is funded by the National Institute on Aging (part of the National Institutes of Health) and the medical device company Functional Neuromodulation Ltd.

Sources:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121205102615.ht
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