Coenzyme Q10 can prevent and treat heart disease by attacking multiple metabolic pathways

NaturalNews) Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ10) is well known as a critical compound required by the body to facilitate normal breakdown of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within cells into energy we need for metabolism and life itself. It should come as no surprise that this vital natural enzyme complex may hold the key to theprevention and reversal of many potentially life-threatening forms of cardiovascular disease.

Several research studies reveal that CoQ10 works at a cellular level to protect delicate DNA and reduce dangerous inflammatory levels that are closely linked to heart disease. Further evidence exists to explain how the coenzyme improves blood flow to the heart muscle and enhances vascular elasticity to prevent arterial stiffening, commonly referred to as ‘hardening of the arteries’. Scientists have also found that CoQ10 lowers unhealthy levels of oxidized LDL cholesterol by modulating gene signals involved with cholesterol metabolism.

Researchers from Spain publishing in the journal Age found that supplementing CoQ10 while consuming a healthy Mediterranean diet lowered markers of DNA damage within cells and reduced systemic inflammation. The net effect of this human study was a dramatic reduction in biological markers associated with cardiovascular disease.

Coenzyme Q10 Lowers DNA Stress and Inflammation to Improve Heart Health

The study was conducted by placing twenty participants, aged 65 or older, on three different diets for four weeks each: a Western diet, a Mediterranean diet, or a Mediterranean diet with 200 mg of Q10. The group taking the Mediterranean diet experienced moderately lowered levels of DNA stress, largely due to the anti-inflammatory effect of a diet high in monounsaturated fats in the form of olive oil.

The group that included CoQ10 had a marked decline in all metabolic markers known to promote DNA damage and a decline in cardiovascular health problems. The study authors concluded that the Mediterranean diet plus CoQ10 “improves oxidative DNA damage in elderly subjects and reduces processes of cellular oxidation. Our results suggest a starting point for the prevention of oxidative processes associated with aging.”

A Chinese research team published in the journal Atherosclerosis examined the effect of CoQ10 on the delicate endothelial lining of the coronary arteries. Endothelial dysfunction is known to be a progenitor to heart disease and heart attack. The scientists demonstrated that individuals placed on CoQ10 (300 mg per day for 12 weeks) showed marked improvement in arterial stiffness due to increased blood flow and improved cellular energy within their endothelial cells.

Scientific evidence is mounting to support coenzyme Q10 as a powerful tool when used to improve cellular energy levels and fight the advances of cardiovascular disease. Most new research is now evolving around the reduced form of the coenzyme known as ubiquinol. Ubiquinol has been found to be up to eight times more potent than standard CoQ10 and lasts much longer in blood circulation. It is quite apparent that most health-minded individuals should supplement with CoQ10 (50 to 300 mg per day depending on cardiovascular health) to improve energy levels and improve vascular circulation to the heart.

Sources for this article include:
http://www.wellnessresources.com
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21404051
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22088605
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21280176

About the author:
John Phillip is a Health Researcher and Author who writes regularly on the cutting edge use of diet, lifestyle modifications and targeted supplementation to enhance and improve the quality and length of life. John is the author of ‘Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan’, a comprehensive EBook explaining how to use Diet, Exercise, Mind and Targeted Supplementation to achieve your weight loss goal. Visit My Optimal Health Resource to continue reading the latest health news updates, and to download your Free 48 page copy of ‘Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan’.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035189_CoQ10_heart_disease_cellular_energy.html#ixzz1ocFvXY80

Can berries and herbs be used to preserve meat naturally without the use of chemical additives?

NaturalNews) Those readers who eat meat probably already know that conventional meat preserving methods typically involve the use of sodium nitrite and other chemical additives linked to causing cancer and other serious health conditions. But new research out of Denmark could eliminate the need for such chemicals by replacing them with herbs, berries and other organic substances that have natural preserving properties.

Scientists from Aarhus University in Denmark have collaborated with the Danish Meat Research Institute (DMRI) to come up with new methods of preserving meat that do not involve synthetic chemicals. And one area of research where they have seen considerable promise thus far involves adding natural herbs and fruits with antibacterial and antiviral characteristics to meat.

For their initial research, Aarhus scientists made a list of 37 plant species believed to have antibacterial properties, which included rosemary, rhubarb, wild garlic, sea buckthorn, rose hip, and hops. After testing their effects on Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Echerichia coli, the list was narrowed down to 15 successful candidates, which were eventually narrowed down to eight that are both effective and capable of being widely grown in Denmark.

In the end, aronia (chokeberry), sage, savory, sloe (blackthorn), lingonberry, wild garlic (ramsons), red currant, and horseradish all made the final list of herbs and berries with demonstrable preserving capabilities. Each of these can be added in various combinations and quantities to meat products for preserving purposes, and in most cases, will add pleasant and desirable flavors to meat.

The team is still in the process of testing these herbs and spices to see how they can best be added to meat, and at what amounts. And the Aarhus University MAPP Centre for Research on Customer Relations in the Food Sector also plans to evaluate the public’s reaction to these new additives to see if they would even be popular on a wide scale.

Back in 2006, research published in the journal Food Microbiology found that both grape seed and pine bark extracts are also powerful, natural meat preservatives. In that study, researchers found that both grape seed and pine bark work better than synthetic preservatives at preventing the growth of harmful microbes and the development of oxidation on meat (http://www.foodnavigator.com).

Sources for this article include:

http://agrsci.au.dk

http://www.icrofs.org/Pages/Research/organicrdd_berrymeat.html

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035132_preservatives_meat_berries.html#ixzz1oRb7vGfW

Specialty ingredients group ELC questions health claims criteria

Speciality ingredients group ELC questions health claims criteria

By Jess Halliday, 29-Oct-2010
Related topics: Health claims, Regulation

The high rejection rate of proposed article 13.1 health claims calls into question the assessment criteria, according to the Federation of European Specialty Food Ingredients Industries (ELC), adding its voice to a swell of concern about the regulation.

Last week EFSA published its third batch of article 13.1 generic health claim opinions, set to be the last until an omnibus batch is published in June 2011. As on the previous two occasions, a high percentage of the 808 opinions were negative.Professor Dr Markwart Kunz, president of the ELC, said: “Explaining physiology and health benefits to the consumer today is subject to the nutrition and health claims regulation, with a future positive list of claims. The evaluation according to EFSA’s criteria will play a key role in the process of pre-market approval of claims.  “Looking at the three batches evaluated – while leaving aside vitamins and minerals – only 5 per cent of the claims received a positive opinion. A rejection rate of 95 per cent calls into question whether the criteria applied are appropriate”. ELC has said it welcomes the opportunity for more dialogue, and that issues over the implementation of the regulation mean there is a real need for a clear view of EFSA’s expectations.EFSA is holding a series of area-specific workshops to provide extra guidance to applicants on what is expected of them. The first of these, to be held on 2 December in Amsterdam, will concern gut health and immunity. This will be followed by three other events next year: in February on post-prandial blood glucose responses/blood glucose control and weight management/energy intake/satiety; in May on oxidative damage and cardiovascular health; and in September on bone, joint and oral health and cognitive function