Natural lemon extract is cytotoxic to breast cancer cells

NaturalNews) A new study has shown for the first time how limonoids, natural compounds present in lemons and other citrus fruit, impede both ER+ and ER- breast cancer cell growth. This sheds new light on the importance of citrus fruit for breast cancer prevention and supports past studies which showed fruit consumption may lower breast cancer risk.

Limonoids show cytotoxic and anti-aromatase effects

For this study, 14 kilograms of dried lemon seeds were powdered and defatted. Nine different limonoids were extracted from the seeds. Seven showed significant cytotoxicity against ER+ breast cancer cells, while four showed cytotoxicity against ER- cells (decreasing growth/viability by as much as 44 percent). Each limonoid was also tested for its ability to induce programmed cell death of the cancer cells (via caspase-7 activation), and one of the most potent was found to be limonin glucoside – which is by far the most abundant limonoid in citrus juices.

The limonoids were also tested for their ability to inhibit aromatase, which is key in limiting the estrogen that ER+ cells can use for growth. All but one of the limonoids proved to be natural aromatase inhibitors, and again, limonin glucoside was at the forefront as the most potent of them all. Thus, limonoids are not only directly toxic to both ER+ and ER- breast cancer cells, but they also work to deprive ER+ cells of the estrogen needed for growth.

Preventing breast cancer is not the only reason to consume citrus limonoids, though. In the lab, limonoids have shown cytotoxicity to colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, neuroblastoma, leukemia, and others. This opens an important question: How much citrus fruit must we consume for meaningful protection from cancer?

Citrus fruit for cancer prevention – How much is needed?

A recent case-control study out of Europe showed that consuming four or more 150-gram portions per week of citrus fruit decreased the risks of throat cancer by 58 percent, oral/pharyngeal cancer by 53 percent, stomach cancer by 31 percent, and colorectal cancer by 18 percent. This study did not find a protective effect of citrus against breast cancer, but a recent American study did show that women consuming about 75 grams daily of grapefruit (fruit or juice) saw a 22 percent reduction in breast cancer risk if they had never used hormone replacement therapy. It is noteworthy that the protective level of citrus consumption was nearly identical in both these studies (525-600 grams per week) and could be interpreted as a minimum intake level for meaningful cancer protection. However, it’s also important to know the best sources of limonoids if they are key to citrus fruit’s anti-cancer properties.

Sources of citrus limonoids – Oranges are best

While the limonoids in the latest study above were taken from lemon seeds, they are also found in the peel, pulp and juice of all citrus fruits. Citrus juices contain approximately 90 to 300 mg per liter of limonoid glucosides (orange juice: 300 mg/l, grapefruit juice: 200 mg/l, lemon or lime juice: 90 mg/l). Citrus pulp and peel contain up to 500mg/kg of limonoids, so if you freshly squeeze your juice, be sure to include as much pulp as possible. Citrus seeds can contain up to two percent by weight of limonoids, with grapefruit seeds being the richest source.

Taken together, these recent studies suggest that women wanting to reduce breast cancer risk should consume at least 75 grams daily of citrus fruit or juice as part of a well-balanced, healthy lifestyle, and that further benefit may be obtained by concentrating on limonoid-rich orange and grapefruit as whole fruit, or pulp-rich juices.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23117440
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19856118
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18026192
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17892257

About the author:
Ethan Evers is author of the award-winning medical thriller “The Eden Prescription,” in which cutting-edge researchers perfect an effective, all-natural treatment for cancer, only to be hunted down by pharmaceutical interests which will stop at nothing to protect their $80 billion cancer drug cash machine. The Eden Prescription is based on the latest science and draws on real historical events stretching back to the beginning of the “War on Cancer.” Ethan has a PhD in Applied Science.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/038235_lemon_extract_breast_cancer_tumor_cells.html#ixzz2EZ9qVjND

Mexico hit by diabetes epidemic as processed American foods take over

NaturalNews) As the U.S. trade deficit continues to soar, the one thing America has been successful at exporting is its fast food industry, and with it, all of the health problems it causes.

When Mexico signed on to become a participant in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in the early 1990s, the country’s leaders thought they were getting unprecedented access to the vast U.S. marketplace. Goods and services would flow more freely between the two countries and Canada; no tariffs, fewer trade regulations and far less red tape.

Well, that experience in “free trade” has turned out not to be so free after all: With an explosion in the importation of American-based fast food venues has come a similar explosion in the waistlines of average Mexicans, who are now collectively more obese than any other country on the planet, except the United States. That will mean infinitely higher healthcare costs for a country that, despite a young labor force and plenty of natural resources, still struggles with crushing poverty.

“With each bite into a greasy taco and slurp of a sugary drink, Mexico hurtles toward what health experts predict will be a public health crisis from diabetes-related disease,” says a report by McClatchy Newspapers.

Diabetes rates rising past the point of treatment capabilities

Citing the most current statistics, the report says one-fifth of all Mexican women and 25 percent of men are thought to now be at risk for diabetes. Already, it is the nation’s number one killer, claiming about 70,000 lives a year – far more than drug cartel and gang violence, which is also high.

Public health officials are blaming the dramatic uptick in diabetes on changes in Mexican lifestyles. Such changes have come from a surge in powerful snack and soft drink industries as well as increasingly sedentary ways of living, as well as a genetic heritage that is susceptible to the chronic, debilitating, life-threatening illness.

The results have already begun to manifest in higher hospital admissions, “where those needing treatment for diabetes-related illness” like blindness and kidney dialysis are clamoring for help, the newspaper group reported.

“The first time we came, we had to wait 12 days for my husband to get dialysis,” Marta Remigio Jasso, who spoke on the grounds of the General Hospital of Mexico, a public unit of the Secretariat of Health, told McClatchy. “I slept under my husband’s hospital bed.”

Some 150,000 Mexicans receive kidney dialysis, but at least that many are denied treatment because they lack insurance, Dr. Abelardo Avial Curiel, a physician and expert in population studies at one of the country’s most prestigious medical centers, the Salvador Zubiran National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition, said.

“When we project the increase in diabetes and the costs associated with it, the Mexican health system will be overwhelmed. It can’t be paid for. By the year 2020, it will be catastrophic. By 2030, it faces collapse,” he said.

Between 6.5 and 10 million Mexicans now have diabetes, according to public health officials. That is fewer than the 20 million diabetes sufferers in the U.S., but the number of sufferers south of the border is likely to expand exponentially, thanks to soaring obesity and a shifting demographics that could soon prove to be too great for public health systems.

“In the next four decades, the population of people 65 years and older will quadruple,” Manuel Ordorica Mellado, a demographer at the Colegio de Mexico, a public research and teaching institution, told McClatchy. “This is vertiginous growth.”

By 2050, Mexico is likely to have about 25 million elderly people, said Mellado, or the equivalent of the nation’s entire population in 1950.

“Diabetes is the primary cause of blindness in Mexico. It’s also the main reason for amputations,” added Carmen Reyes de Ortega, the executive director of the Mexican Diabetes Association, a nonprofit advocacy and educational group.

Reyes de Ortega noted that the outlook for the country is not good. “We’ll have a lot of people suffering blindness, with mobility problems and needing dialysis.”

Mexicans now consuming more soda than Americans

The Mexican lifestyle has changed dramatically in the past few decades. As urban centers became more crowded, it forced workers into long commutes. Also, concerns about public safety have kept more Mexicans cooped up at home.

For instance, workers who would go home for long lunch breaks and consume freshly prepared foods can no longer do that.

“It is practically impossible to go home to eat lunch now,” said Dr. Gabriela Ortiz, a department director at the National Center for Preventative Health and Disease Control. “We ask for food to be delivered to our office. Some employees go out to the taco stands on the corner or to the street markets.”

In addition, because of concerns about the safety of public drinking water, more Mexicans have begun to consume sugary drinks.

“Coca-Cola is a great villain, but it is not the only one,” Avila pointed out, adding that some 30 of Mexico’s 500 largest businesses produce snacks or other types of junk food, carbonated or sugary beverages.

Figures show that Mexicans now consume about 40 percent more sugary drinks per year than do Americans.

Sources:

http://www.mcclatchydc.com

http://articles.cnn.com

http://voices.yahoo.com

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/038234_Mexico_diabetes_epidemic_processed_foods.html#ixzz2EZ9Ir3aJ

Higher vitamin D intake linked with cognitive performance and Alzheimer’s disease risk in women

NaturalNews) Higher blood saturation levels of vitamin D have been conclusively shown to lower the risk for a myriad of chronic illnesses including heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. More recent scientific studies are beginning to draw a solid connection between intake of the sunshine vitamin and how well we retain memories, utilize thought processes and learn new concepts. Additionally, many forward thinking health researchers are providing clear evidence that the prohormone can impact the overall risk for developing the insidious memory robbing illness known as Alzheimer’s disease.

A research team from the Angers University Hospital in France has released the results of a study in the Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences that demonstrates how vitamin D may be a vital component for the cognitive health of women as they age. In the study, scientists provide evidence to demonstrate that higher vitamin D dietary intake is associated with a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Study highlights the critical importance of vitamin D supplementation among the elderly

In past studies, researchers have concluded that low vitamin D levels among older women are associated with higher odds of global cognitive impairment and a higher risk of global cognitive decline. This study was based on an analysis of 6,257 older women who had vitamin D levels measured during the Study of Osteopathic Fractures and whose cognitive function was tested by the Mini-Mental State Examination.

The researchers found that participants with the lowest blood concentration of vitamin D (fewer than 10 ng/mL using the standard 25(OH)D blood test) were associated with significantly higher odds of global cognitive impairment at baseline among the older women. Those with blood saturation levels considered to be low (fewer than 20 ng/mL) were associated with a higher risk of incident global cognitive decline, as measured by performance on the Mental State Examination. It is important to note that vitamin D readings below 20 ng/mL are frequent among those aged 65 and older, placing them at considerable risk for cognitive decline and dementia.

The study team concluded that “women who developed Alzheimer’s disease had lower baseline vitamin D intakes (an average of 50.3 micrograms per week) than those who developed other dementias (an average of 63.6 micrograms per week) or no dementia at all (an average of 59.0 micrograms per week).” Conversion of vitamin D in the skin from sun exposure declines rapidly after the age of 50, necessitating a prudent supplementation program to maintain optimal blood saturation levels (50 to 70 ng/mL) and dramatically lower risk for memory loss, cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s dementia.

Sources for this article include:

http://biomedgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/67/11/1205
http://www.sciencenewsline.com/articles/2012120112020007.html
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-11/tgso-vdt113012.php
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121130222245.htm

About the author:
John Phillip is a Certified Nutritional Consultant and Health Researcher and Author who writes regularly on the cutting edge use of diet, lifestyle modifications and targeted supplementation to enhance and improve the quality and length of life. John is the author of ‘Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan’, a comprehensive EBook explaining how to use Diet, Exercise, Mind and Targeted Supplementation to achieve your weight loss goal. Visit My Optimal Health Resource to continue reading the latest health news updates, and to download your Free 48 page copy of ‘Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan’.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/038219_vitamin_D_Alzheimers_disease_cognitive_performance.html#ixzz2EZ8afZyX

Thyme out for cold, flu, and other organisms

NaturalNews) Another member of the labiatae, or mint, family, thyme is an herb native to the Mediterranean basin and comes in many varieties. There is only one plant, thymus vulgaris, but the composition of the oil distilled from the plant shows variations in chemical components based on the location or region the plant grows in, despite being botanically identical. The microbial power of thyme is so powerful that some oils are safe to use in all situations, and some are not. Thymus vularis ct. linalol is the best oil for beginners to use and it is the safest to use on the skin, in baths, and on children and the elderly. Other chemotypes (ct) such as thymus vulgaris ct. thujanol, thymus vulgaris ct. thymol, and thymus vulgaris c.t carvacrol should be left to qualified aromatherapists. Thyme is one of the most used and most useful oils in aromatherapy, but always use thyme oil with care, in moderation.

Thyme has remarkable antiviral, bactericidal, fungicidal, antibiotic, diuretic, antispasmodic, expectorant, and antiseptic properties that make it wonderful to have around during cold and flu season. In addition to killing microbes, thyme helps the body to eliminate toxins and boosts the immune system by supporting the formation of white blood cells, increasing resistance to invading organisms. Its familiar, warm, herbaceous aroma is powerful and penetrating, and the origin of its name, which comes from the Greek word ‘thymos’ meaning ‘to perfume.’

The history of thyme

Thyme has a long and fascinating history. Used by all the early civilizations of the Mediterranean as a medicinal plant, both Hippocrates and Dioscorides described its uses in their writings. The ancient Egyptians used it for embalming. The ancient Greeks burned it as an incense in their temples and used it in their baths for courage. The Romans brought the herb to Europe, and used it to purify their rooms and give ‘aromatic flavor’ to cheese and liqueurs. In the Middle Ages, thyme was placed in bedrooms to ward off nightmares, given to knights for courage, taken into courtrooms to ward off diseases, and used at funerals to assure safe passage to the afterlife. Before modern antibiotics, thyme was used to medicate bandages.

Thyme is an easy to grown perennial shrub that can tolerate hot, sunny places well. It has long been used as a culinary herb. It delays the putrefaction of meat, a very useful trait in warm climates before refrigeration. Studies in modern times have verified this use with tests that prove adding essential oil of thyme slowed the proliferation of bacteria, preserving the food for an additional three days. Ingesting thyme also stimulates the digestive system and serves as an intestinal antiseptic.

Health benefits throughout thyme

Other traditional uses of thyme include the treatment of respiratory infections. An excellent pulmonary disinfectant, thyme is useful against flus, colds, sore throats, asthma, catarrh, coughs, laryngitis, whooping cough, and bronchitis. Inhale for nose, throat, and chest infections; for mouth and gum infections (such as thrush, gingivitis), use in toothpaste or mouthwash/gargle. As little as a .1 percent solution is effective. After a study in Germany, many researchers believe the effectiveness of cough medicines is due to the exhalation (after swallowing) of the local action of the essential oil on the respiratory tract. Extensive research has shown the effectiveness of essential oils, including thyme, as expectorants and to increase mucus secretions to relieve dry coughs. Inhalation in small amounts worked best; too strong has the opposite effect. Inhaled treatments are especially effective when treating chronic infections that linger in the sinuses.

Thyme is used as a remedy for physical and psychological weakness, and still is today. Useful for regaining strength after illness, chronic fatigue, or depression it can also be used to help insomnia as its effects are balancing. It stimulates circulation, aids concentration, raises blood pressure that is too low, and has even been thought to increase intelligence and memory. It revives, strengthens, and balances both mind and body.

The essential oil of thyme is antibacterial, acting on the bacteria’s enzymes. As such, it has been used in soapy solutions for disinfecting hands before surgery, being a stronger antiseptic than most used in hospitals. Thyme can destroy staphylococcus at a dilution of 1,000 times. A study in France showed thyme to be among several essential oils that were found to destroy 90 percent of microbes within three hours, when used in a vaporizer. It deodorized the air and purified it from proteus, staphylococcus, streptococcus, and cryptococcal.

Additional uses include:

• Thyme is useful on infections of the urinary tract and bladder, and also acts as a diuretic, increasing its effectiveness

• Also use for candida and vaginitis

• Use to kill nail fungus

• Thyme is an ingredient in natural hand sanitizers

• Add thyme to a hot compress to relieve rheumatic pain, muscular aches and pains, sprains, sports injuries, sciatica, arthritis, gout

• Crush the fresh herb or use diluted oil as first aid on insect bites and stings

• Use on athlete’s foot. For this use, you can apply the oil neat, or undiluted, but protect the skin with some fatty cream. Other neat applications include animal bites and boils.

• Use a one percent solution as an antibacterial wash for fresh produce

• Use in hair and skin care regimes, as a hair tonic or in a face wash and for treatment of things like acne or warts

• Use thyme in a sitz bath or massage to stimulate menstruation for weak or missing periods

• Use to kill parasites

• Thymol, a chemical constituent in thyme essential oil, has been found to increase blood-flow to the skin, thought to speed healing

• Thymol has been found to protect and increase the percentage of healthy fats found in cell membranes

• Dietary consumption of thyme has been shown to increase the amount of DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid) in brain, kidney, and heart cell membranes

• Thyme will discourage insects from invading your home

• Use thyme with rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood in a mixture of grapeseed and jojoba carrier oils to treat alopecia areata. According to the double-blind controlled clinical trial, massage the mixture into the scalp daily for several months.

• Because of the risk of irritation, it is a good idea to use thyme in blends. It blends particularly well with bergamot, grapefruit, lemon, lavender, rosemary and pine.

Contraindications and considerations for use

It is not recommended to use thyme essential oil in its pure, concentrated form directly on the skin as it can be irritating to sensitive skin. The stronger oils, used in concentrated form could cause sensitization to the immune system or stimulate the thyroid gland and lymphatic system. Do not use if pregnant, but useful during labor to move along ‘failure to progress’ and expel afterbirth. Avoid in the presence of high blood pressure or epilepsy. If you have cancer, liver damage, or other serious health conditions, use under the guidance of a qualified practitioner.

A conservative but effective way to use essential oil of thyme is to massage it into the soles of the feet. This method is typically well tolerated, reaching the lower bronchial capillaries, then through the circulatory system, the whole body, all without being absorbed into the liver. It is also very effective to inhale thyme, using a few drops on a tissue or handkerchief, or putting in an aroma burner or vaporizer/humidifier.

Sources for this article include:

Davis, Patricia. Aromatherapy: An A-Z. Barnes and Noble Books, New York 1995. P. 313-315.

Fischer-Rizzi, Susanne. Complete Aromatherapy Handbook. Sterling Publishing Co, New York 1990. p. 212-213.

Worwood, Valerie Ann. The Complete Book of Essential Oils & Aromatherapy. New World Library, San Rafael, CA, 1991. P. 21-22.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyme

http://www.naturalnews.com/030814_rosemary_herbs.html

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037696_thyme_colds_flu.html#ixzz2AQC3KxL4

Monsanto-funded ‘No on 37’ campaign fabricates FDA quote, engages in criminal misconduct

NaturalNews) The No on 37 campaign trying to prevent Californians from knowing whether or not the foods they eat contain genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) has sunk to a new moral and ethical low, having recently forged a quote from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in supposed opposition to the labeling law.

According to the California Right to Know campaign working towards mandatory GMO labeling in the Golden State, No on 37 deliberately fabricated a quote insinuating that the FDA opposes GMO labeling. The quote, which bears the official FDA logo, states:

“The US Food and Drug Administration says a labeling policy like Prop 37 would be ‘inherently misleading.'”

The FDA never actually issued such a statement, of course, as the law prohibits the agency from taking an official position on the matter. But for its own malicious purposes, the No on 37 campaign decided to affix both the quote and the FDA seal on its campaign propaganda in an attempt to sway public opinion against the measure.

Since knowingly falsifying quotes and counterfeiting logos for campaign purposes directly violates Section 506 of the U.S. Criminal Code, Right to Know has notified the U.S Department of Justice (DOJ) via letter that No on 37 has flagrantly violated the law.

In the letter, Right to Know explains that No on 37 disseminated a direct mail piece containing the fraudulent quote, which was apparently parsed from an unrelated and out of context statement the FDA made more than 20 years ago. It adds that the mailer violates not only Section 506 but also Section 1017 of the U.S. Criminal Code.

You can read the full Right to Know letter to DOJ here: http://www.carighttoknow.org/deptofjustice

Beyond simply forging an FDA quote, the No on 37 campaign also apparently submitted a fraudulent “Rebuttal to Argument in Favor of Proposition 37” that was published in the official California voter guide.

According to Right to Know, a certain Dr. Henry I. Miller, who is identified solely as “Founding Director, Office of Biotechnology of the Food & Drug Administration” in the guide, does not actually work for the FDA in any capacity. Thus, his listing in the guide blatantly violates U.S. Criminal Code 912, which prohibits individuals from assuming or pretending to be federal employees.

None of this is surprising since the primary forces fueling the No on 37 campaign include Monsanto and various other biotechnology and chemical giants with a sordid history of lies and deceit. Even so, these companies and their front campaign still need to be held criminally responsible for violating the law in an attempt to illegally thwart an election.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.carighttoknow.org/jumpsuits

http://www.naturalnews.com

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037699_Monsanto_criminal_misconduct_No_on_37.html#ixzz2AQBRJP3v

Health benefits of steam inhalation

NaturalNews) Steam inhalation is a method of introducing warm, moist air into the lungs via the nose and throat for therapeutic benefit. Essential oils are often added to provide additional relief. Ancient Egyptians recognized the good therapeutic effects of inhalation therapy through the use of public baths. Steam inhalation has since become a simple and effective home remedy for various health issues.

Respiratory benefits

Inhaling steam is a great treatment for respiratory complications and is recommended for dealing with common cold, flu, bronchitis, sinusitis, asthma, and allergies. Dry air passages are moistened, and mucus is loosened/eliminated easier by coughing or blowing the nose. The moist air also alleviates difficulty breathing, throat irritation and inflammation.

Natural expectorant

An expectorant increases the amount of secretions, resulting in clearer secretions and as a result, lubricates the irritated respiratory tract. The inhalation of steam significantly benefits the lungs and throat by acting like an effective natural expectorant. This helps to relax muscles, thereby relieving coughing. Inhaling steam is also necessary for preventing excessive drying of the mucous membranes.

Improved circulation

When the body’s temperature rises, blood vessels begin to dilate. This encourages blood flow and overall circulation in the body. The increase in circulation can provide relief from headaches and migraines. The rise in temperature can also strengthen the immune system by stimulating the circulation of germ fighting white blood cells.

Pore cleansing and rejuvenation

As previously mentioned, steam inhalation improves circulation which can also improve the skin’s appearance. Additionally, the topical application of steam can be beneficial. Sebum is the natural oil that lubricates and moisturizes skin. When pores are clogged with sebum and other particles such as dirt and makeup, acne breakouts oftentimes appear. Steam softens these plugs and opens pores so that sebum can flow naturally and remove impurities. Steam also loosens the dead skin cells on the skin allowing new cells to emerge. The result is a soft, youthful glow.

Essential oils

Many find that aromatherapy provides more relief than steam alone. To alleviate symptoms, essential oils may be added to the steaming water. These are generally used sparingly, with only two to three drops being used at a time.

  • For upper respiratory and sinus congestion: Peppermint, and/or eucalyptus
  • For headaches: Chamomile and/or lavender
  • For relaxation: Chamomile, lavender and/or lemongrass
  • For oily skin: Chamomile, lemongrass, lavender, rosemary, anise, and/or fennel
  • For dry skin: Fennel, rosemary, sea buckthorn, peppermint and/or comfrey

Enjoying steam inhalation

Thankfully, steam inhalation does not have to be complicated or expensive. A common method of inhaling steam is to boil a few cups of filtered water and then pour the steaming water into a large bowl. Essential oils can be added at this point if desired. Next, a towel can be placed over the head, while leaning over the bowl of water, breathing deeply through the nose for approximately 15 minutes. Humidifiers also provide a gentle form of steam inhalation.

Use caution

Since very hot water is used, there is a burn risk associated with inhaling steam. For this reason, it is typically not recommended as a treatment for young children. Many doctors also advise against steam inhalation for pregnant women or people with high blood pressure and/or heart conditions.

Sources of this article include:

1. M.A. Shehata: History Of Inhalation Therapy. The Internet Journal of Health. 2009 Volume 9 Number 1. DOI: 10.5580/10d8
2. D. Ophir, Y. Elad: Effects of Steam Inhalation on Nasal Patency and Nasal Symptoms in Patients with the Common Cold. PubMed. 1987 May-Jun; 8(2):149-53
3. V.A. Worwood: The Complete Book of Essential Oils & Aromatherapy. New World Library. 1993
4. http://www.naturalnews.com/031215_sauna_health.html

About the author:
Jordan and Kyla are passionate about health; together, they have overcome many illnesses through dietary / lifestyle changes, and the art of practicing a positive mindset daily. Kyla is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and is currently studying to become a Reiki Master, and Jordan is currently learning about traditional North American medicinal herbs, in hopes of becoming a Certified Herbalist. You may visit http://www.guidinginstincts.com for more information.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037687_steam_inhalation_respiratory_system_circulation.html#ixzz2AQ76xMrD

Prehistoric skull tells researchers that man needed meat in order to thrive

NaturalNews) A prehistoric human skull recently unearthed from a gorge in eastern Africa provides new evidence that meat has actually been a vital part of the human diet for far longer than some scientists believe. According to research out of The Complutense University in Madrid, Spain, the skull fragment exhibits clear signs of B-vitamin deficiency, which researchers believe points to the fact that humans have always needed meat in their diets to avoid vitamin deficiencies and facilitate proper development.

Published in the open-access journal PLoS One, the findings contradict an erroneous belief held by some that early man was primarily vegetarian, and that meat was a rare or nonexistent component of the prehistoric diet. Based on the types of bone lesions observed in the skull, which appears to have come from a child of about two years of age, the research team determined that the individual to whom it was once attached had anemia due to an inadequate amount of meat in the diet.

Because the skull appears to have come from a child who was just leaving the weaning period of his life, the team says the lesions appear indicative of meat deficiency, as the child had not yet transitioned from breast milk to solid foods that included meat. The child’s mother was apparently also meat-deficient, since she clearly did not pass on the necessary vitamins for healthy development to her child.

“I know this will sound awful to vegetarians, but meat made us human,” said researcher and archaeologist Manuel Dominguez-Rodrigo about the findings. “Human brain development could not have existed without a diet based on regular consumption of meat.”

The meat consumed by early humans was far different than the type consumed in mainstream society today, however. Rather than be raised in confinement and fed unnatural, genetically-modified (GM) corn and soy, animals eaten for food in prehistoric days lived in the wild where they hunted other small animals or grazed on grasslands. This major difference accounts for the compositional differences between wild meat and confined meat, the latter of which is linked to causing chronic health problems.

Grass-fed, pastured meat and meat products are the closest equivalent to the type of meat that prehistoric man ate, and it is the best option for you and your family today. Unlike feedlot-based meat and meat products, which contain virtually no omega-3 fatty acids, grass-fed meat and meat products are nutritionally superior and contain balanced ratios of the nutrients the body needs for vibrant health. (http://www.eatwild.com/healthbenefits.htm)

Sources for this article include:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk

http://www.livescience.com/23671-eating-meat-made-us-human.html

 

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037526_prehistoric_skulls_meat_consumption_human_diet.html#ixzz29DV3X0ec

Painkillers cause severe headaches

(NaturalNews) Taking a painkiller for that bad back or those bum knees? That could explain why you might be having so many headaches as well, according to new research from the United Kingdom.According to doctors, up to one million people in the UK have “completely preventable” headaches that can be quite severe and are caused by taking too many painkillers.Doctors have said some patients have become trapped in a “vicious cycle” of taking such medications, which in turn has led to even more headaches, the BBC reported.The information and warning come as part of the first guidelines for treating headaches put out by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. The guidelines also recommended using acupuncture to treat headaches in some circumstances.’An easy thing to prevent’What the organization has described as “medication overuse headaches” tend to feel the same as other types of common headaches and migraines. And while there is no definitive data in the UK regarding the incidence of the condition, studies in other countries suggest that between one and two percent of people are affected.The World Health Organization, meanwhile, says figures are actually closer to five percent, according to some reports.”Various forms of headache, properly called headache disorders, are among the most common disorders of the nervous system. They are pandemic and, in many cases, life-long conditions,” says a WHO Media Center report. “The evident burden of headache disorders on individuals and on society is sufficient to justify a strategic change in the approach to headache management.”The natural response to such a condition would actually be to increase use of painkillers, but that is only worsening it, say UK researchers.”This can end up getting into a vicious cycle where your headache gets worse, so you take more painkillers, so your headache gets worse and this just becomes worse and worse and worse,” says Prof. Martin Underwood, of Warwick Medical School, who led the NICE panel, adding: “It is such an easy thing to prevent.”Researchers aren’t exactly sure how painkillers cause headache disorders. But what is known is that most of those affected by the condition are believed to have started suffering either every day tension-type headaches or migraines which became worse as they tried to treat them at home.Manjit Matharu, a consultant neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, told the BBC there appeared to be a point after 10 to 15 days’ worth of using pain relief each month when the medications became an issue.Over-medicating with painkillers is the problem so go natural”This is a huge problem in the population,” he said. “The figures in terms of the number of people who have medication overuse headache are one in 50, so that is approximately a million people who have headaches on a daily or near daily basis because they’re using painkillers.”According to the panel, people who have a family history of tension headaches or migraines could be genetically more vulnerable to headaches caused by medication overuse. Such people could also be susceptible when taking pain relief for other reasons not related to headaches.The new NICE guidelines for physicians in England and Wales recommend telling sufferers to stop taking all forms of pain relief immediately – though that is likely to lead to a few weeks of agony as patients will then have to deal with headaches sans pain relief, until their symptoms eventually improve.That said, there are a number of natural remedies for headaches and migraines, many of which are extremely simple and effective, and which could alleviate the need for any medications at all. They include herbal remedies like feverfew, mineral supplementation with magnesium, B2 and CoEnzymeQ10, and various oils like fish oil and peppermint oil. Read about here at Natural News.Sources:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-19622016http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22547100http://www.naturalnews.com/migraines.htmlLearn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037309_painkillers_headaches_medication.html#ixzz27WMh1rT4

Receivers of flu vaccine more likely to catch H1N1 virus, new study finds

NaturalNews) New information has emerged concerning the Great Swine Flu Hoax of 2009 and the mass vaccination hysteria that accompanied it. As it turns out, the seasonal influenza vaccine that was pushed on everyone as an added preventive measure against H1N1 appears to have been responsible for actually inducing more cases of H1N1 infection, this according to shocking new data procured by an influenza expert at Canada’s B.C. Centre for Disease Control.Dr. Danuta Skowronski from the Canadian equivalent of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently observed as part of a comprehensive analysis that individuals who received an annual flu shot during the 2008-09 winter season had a disproportionately higher risk of developing H1N1 infection than individuals who were not vaccinated. Confirming earlier suspicions, Dr. Skowronski and her colleagues observed after recreating the phenomenon in a group of ferrets that the annual flu shot from that year was definitively linked to higher rates of H1N1 infection.Presented at the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in San Francisco, the study included evaluating 32 ferrets, half of who received the 2008-09 seasonal flu shot, and the other half of who received a placebo shot. The researchers did not know which ferrets received which vaccine until the end of the study.Upon conclusion, all the ferrets ended up developing H1N1, but the ferrets from the vaccinated group were the first to get it. The vaccinated group also became much sicker than the unvaccinated group, and appears to have very likely infected the unvaccinated group. These findings match up with those of five other Canadian studies conducted in other provinces outside British Columbia where elevated rates of H1N1 infection were also observed among individuals who had received their annual flu shot.”The findings are consistent with the increased risk that we saw in the human studies,” said Dr. Skowronski to the Vancouver Sun.What this all goes to show, of course, is that not only was the seasonal flu shot a failure at preventing H1N1, but it was also apparently a cause of H1N1 infection. If the seasonal flu shot had been properly tested, which it most definitely was not, it would have become apparent that the shot was not only ineffective at preventing H1N1, but also a definitive cause of H1N1 infection.Sources for this article include:http://www.prisonplanet.comhttp://www.vancouversun.comhttp://www.cidrap.umn.eduLearn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037302_flu_vaccines_H1N1_infections.html#ixzz27WKpNn7L

Mechanism That Leads to Sporadic Parkinson’s Disease Identified

ScienceDaily (Sep. 25, 2012) — Researchers in the Taub Institute at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have identified a mechanism that appears to underlie the common sporadic (non-familial) form of Parkinson’s disease, the progressive movement disorder. The discovery highlights potential new therapeutic targets for Parkinson’s and could lead to a blood test for the disease. The study, based mainly on analysis of human brain tissue, was published September 25 in the online edition of Nature Communications.   Studies of rare, familial (heritable) forms of Parkinson’s show that a protein called alpha-synuclein plays a role in the development of the disease. People who have extra copies of the alpha-synuclein gene produce excess alpha-synuclein protein, which can damage neurons. The effect is most pronounced in dopamine neurons, a population of brain cells in the substantia nigra that plays a key role in controlling normal movement and is lost in Parkinson’s. Another key feature of Parkinson’s is the presence of excess alpha-synuclein aggregates in the brain. As the vast majority of patients with Parkinson’s do not carry rare familial mutations, a key question has been why these individuals with common sporadic Parkinson’s nonetheless acquire excess alpha-synuclein protein and lose critical dopamine neurons, leading to the disease. Using a variety of techniques, including gene-expression analysis and gene-network mapping, the CUMC researchers discovered how common forms of alpha-synuclein contribute to sporadic Parkinson’s. “It turns out multiple different alpha-synuclein transcript forms are generated during the initial step in making the disease protein; our study implicates the longer transcript forms as the major culprits,” said study leader Asa Abeliovich, MD, PhD, associate professor of pathology and neurology at CUMC. “Some very common genetic variants in the alpha-synuclein gene, present in many people, are known to impact the likelihood that an individual will suffer from sporadic Parkinson’s. In our study, we show that people with ‘bad’ variants of the gene make more of the elongated alpha-synuclein transcript forms. This ultimately means that more of the disease protein is made and may accumulate in the brain.” “An unusual aspect of our study is that it is based largely on detailed analysis of actual patient tissue, rather than solely on animal models,” said Dr. Abeliovich. “In fact, the longer forms of alpha-synuclein are human-specific, as are the disease-associated genetic variants. Animal models don’t really get Parkinson’s, which underscores the importance of including the analysis of human brain tissue.” “Furthermore, we found that exposure to toxins associated with Parkinson’s can increase the abundance of this longer transcript form of alpha-synuclein. Thus, this mechanism may represent a common pathway by which environmental and genetic factors impact the disease,” said Dr. Abeliovich. The findings suggest that drugs that reduce the accumulation of elongated alpha-synuclein transcripts in the brain might have therapeutic value in the treatment of Parkinson’s. The CUMC team is currently searching for drug candidates and has identified several possibilities. The study also found elevated levels of the alpha-synuclein elongated transcripts in the blood of a group of patients with sporadic Parkinson’s, compared with unaffected controls. This would suggest that a test for alpha-synuclein may serve as a biomarker for the disease. “There is a tremendous need for a biomarker for Parkinson’s, which now can be diagnosed only on the basis of clinical symptoms. The finding is particularly intriguing, but needs to be validated in additional patient groups,” said Dr. Abeliovich. A biomarker could also speed clinical trials by giving researchers a more timely measure of a drug’s effectiveness. The study was supported by the grants from the Michael J. Fox Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (RO1NS064433).