Naturally relieve and heal toothaches and tooth infections

NaturalNews) Toothaches generally occur when a tooth’s nerve root becomes irritated. The most common causes of toothaches are infection, decay, injury, or loss of a tooth. Pain may also occur after a tooth has been pulled. While no one enjoys a painful tooth, the good news is that tooth pain and infections can usually be relieved and healed naturally.

If your toothache comes from an abscess or other infection, combine the use of 1) oil of oregano topically and internally; 2) colloidal silver topically, internally and for swishing; and 3) warm salt water for alternate swishing as follows:

1. Take several drops of oil of oregano under the tongue. Hold for a few minutes and then swish with lots of colloidal silver as frequently as once every hour.

2. Spit out the colloidal silver and then swallow additional colloidal silver (up to 8 ounces total in a day).

3. Gently rub some colloidal silver into the gum area around the tooth.

4. After a few minutes, rub oil of oregano onto the gum area.

5. In between the colloidal silver swishes also do a fairly vigorous warm salt water swish (preferably sea salt) and follow that up with more oil of oregano rubbed into the gums.

More natural remedies which can relieve and heal painful toothaches

1. Purchase some ginger root. Cut off a piece of the ginger root and remove the skin. Put the piece in your mouth on top of the painful tooth and bite down on it. The pain should subside very quickly. Keep the rest of the ginger in a container in the refrigerator and replace the piece in your mouth periodically as needed.

2. Relieve a throbbing tooth with clove essential oil (Syzygium aromaticum). The aromatic chemical in clove called eugenol numbs pain and kills bacteria. To apply the clove oil, soak a cotton ball or swab with the oil and use it to wipe on and around your sore gums and tooth. Repeat as needed.

3. Take one teaspoon of blackseed oil (Nigella sativa) and 1/2 cup of vinegar and boil. Cool and then use as a mouth rinse to reduce inflammation and infection. Rinse every couple of hours until the pain and/or swelling is gone.

4. For tooth abscess and infection, put two level teaspoons of salt in a cup. Pour a small amount of boiling water on the salt in a cup to dissolve it and then fill the cup with enough cool water to make the solution warm. Rinse your mouth slowly and well, using all the salt water. Repeat at least twice a day (the more often the better). If this does not work at first, try increasing the amount of salt.

5. Use a cold pack or other cold items to relieve pain. When you have a toothache, pressing something cold on the outside of your mouth can often give temporary relief, especially if you are having problems sleeping. If you don’t have a cold pack, no need to worry about ice that will melt in the middle of the night – simply grab anything from your fridge or freezer. You can use a jar of mustard, a bottle of water, you name it. If the container is frozen, cover with a wash cloth before placing on the skin. Note: Do not take a food item to bed which will spoil.

6. Supplements which may help clear infection and speed healing include olive leaf extract and bromelain.

Note: If your tooth pain worsens or persists more than a few days, see a qualified

Dietary Cadmium May Be Linked With Breast Cancer Risk

ScienceDaily (Mar. 15, 2012) — Dietary cadmium, a toxic metal widely dispersed in the environment and found in many farm fertilizers, may lead to an increased risk of breast cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.


Cadmium occurs at low concentrations naturally, but scientists are concerned because contamination of farmland mainly due to atmospheric deposition and use of fertilizers leads to higher uptake in plants.

“Because of a high accumulation in agricultural crops, the main sources of dietary cadmium are bread and other cereals, potatoes, root crops and vegetables,” said Agneta Åkesson, Ph.D., associate professor at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. “In general, these foods are also considered healthy.”

For the current study, Åkesson and colleagues observed 55,987 women for more than 12 years. They estimated the dietary cadmium exposure using a food frequency questionnaire. During the follow-up period, researchers observed 2,112 incidents of breast cancer including 1,626 estrogen receptor-positive and 290 estrogen receptor-negative cases.

Cadmium consumption was divided into three groups with the highest levels of exposure compared with the lowest. Overall, a higher exposure to cadmium via diet was linked with a 21 percent increase in breast cancer. Among lean and normal weight women, the increased risk was 27 percent.

Both estrogen receptor-positive and negative tumors had the same risk increase at roughly 23 percent. Åkesson said that women who consumed higher amounts of whole grain and vegetables had a lower risk of breast cancer compared to women exposed to dietary cadmium through other foods.

“It’s possible that this healthy diet to some extent can counteract the negative effect of cadmium, but our findings need to be confirmed with further studies,” said Åkesson. “It is, however, important that the exposure to cadmium from all food is low.”

Homeopaths under assault in Australia after NHMRC threatens to declare their work unethical

NaturalNews) A draft document not intended for public release has revealed that the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in Australia is planning to nix homeopathy from its list of covered medical treatments. The Age reports that the draft paper, which was recently leaked to reporters, dubs homeopathy an “unethical” form of medical treatment, and alleges that patients who choose homeopathy over conventional medicine could be putting themselves at risk.

Though it has been used safely and effectively for hundreds of years by millions of people around the world, homeopathy is increasingly finding itself in the crosshairs of government-run healthcare programs like NHMRC that are heavily influenced by pharmaceutical interests determined to destroy access to natural forms of treatment. And unless the natural health community fights back, the practice of homeopathy “down under” could soon be a thing of the past.

Contrary to conventional belief, homeopathy is not merely a placebo. Numerous peer-reviewed scientific studies conducted over the years have shown that homeopathy can help treat respiratory ailments and allergies, influenza, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, childhood diarrhea, post-surgical abdominal surgery recovery, and attention deficit disorder (ADD), as well as many other conditions (http://www.naturalnews.com/031210_Luc_Montagnier_Homeopathy.html).

Because of its proven track record of success, homeopathy continues to be widely used throughout Europe, including in Great Britain, as well as in the United States and Canada, because it is effective and does not produce negative side effects. And because of its relatively low cost compared to conventional “Western” drug treatments, homeopathy is a practical, cost-effective form of medicine that can also help reign in the costs of out-of-control healthcare spending.

Rather than allow Australians to make their own healthcare choices, in other words, NHMRC wants to follow the lead of the British House of Commons in declaring homeopathy to be no more efficacious than a placebo in order to defund it from the public health service. So Australian citizens who choose to use homeopathy will now have to pay for it out of their own pockets.

Greg Cope, President of the Australian Homeopathic Association, has reportedly been in the process of submitting new clinical trials to NHMRC that demonstrate the effectiveness of homeopathy in a bid to keep it funded. But it remains to be seen whether or not the medical body will pay attention to it to preserve freedom of health choice in this matter.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.theage.com.au

http://www.news.com.au

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035264_homeopaths_Australia_medical_ethics.html#ixzz1pIe9rsjL

Just a few minutes of daily exercise alters DNA to help prevent chronic disease

NaturalNews) Many people think the genes they inherited at birth are static and predetermine their fate for the remainder of their life. Extensive research into the science of epigenetics is providing startling evidence that this thought process is grossly outdated, and our individual DNA is dynamic and continually influenced by multiple lifestyle factors including diet, environment, stress and physical activity.

Researchers publishing the result of a study in the journal Cell Metabolism provide evidence that that when healthy but inactive men and women exercise for a matter of minutes, it produces a rather immediate change to their DNA. While we cannot change our core DNA code, exercise does influence the DNA molecules within our muscles. Scientists have found that DNA is chemically and structurally altered or expressed in very important ways that affect a myriad of metabolic processes that protect us from chronic disease.

The scientists found that DNA modifications signal precise genetic reprogramming in muscles that determine overall muscle strength as well as structural and metabolic benefits derived from physical activity. Study leader, Dr. Juleen Zierath noted “Our muscles are really plastic … muscle adapts to what you do. If you don’t use it, you lose it, and this is one of the mechanisms that allows that to happen.”

Short bursts of moderate intensity exercise positively influences DNA expression

Epigenetic modifications involve the addition or deletion of chemical markers on the DNA strand that change rapidly based on environmental influences such as the nutritional composition of your last meal, pollutants in the environment or the intensity of an exercise workout. Researchers found that DNA within skeletal muscle examined after a short burst of exercise bore fewer chemical markers (specifically methyl groups) than it did before exercise.

The study team specifically determined that the DNA modifications occurred in stretches of DNA that are involved in expressing genes known to be important for muscular adaptation to exercise. This research clearly provides more evidence that our genetic constitution is continually evolving in an effort to protect us, and is positively influenced by short, moderately intense bursts of physical activity. These alterations allow us to adapt quickly to the changing environment that surrounds us.

Dr. Zierath concluded “Exercise is medicine … and it seems the means to alter our genome for better health may be only a jog away.” The finding of this study may explain recent research showing that the best form of exercise works our musculature in short bursts of moderate to full intensity (as measured by attaining maximum heart rate for your age range) for several minutes in duration, followed by a rest period and then another energy burst. Combining this evidence with an organic whole food diet will positively influence your genes toward optimal health.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/retrieve/pii/S1550413112000058

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120306131254.htm

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035259_daily_exercise_DNA_disease_prevention.html#ixzz1pIdnjQ00

After the shudder”: The medical community reacts to new warnings attached to statins

NaturalNews) Amidst back-peddling and protestations of “minuscule risk” by many in the medical community, the Food and Drug Administration announced its decision to add diabetes and memory loss to the list of side effects to some of the most widely prescribed statins. The recent news has sent the drug companies and the medical community into a full scale PR campaign to repair the damage caused by this new warning.

Many doctors will not be deterred from prescribing statins notwithstanding these new warnings. For example, in an interview with ABC News, Dr. Richard Honaker, a physician with the Family Medicine Associates of Texas in Carrollton, Texas, defended the drugs, stating, “This news will make the care of my patients more difficult and less effective… Some patients are always reading up on their medications on the Internet, and it seems they only read the negative and not the positive.” Dr. Honaker’s disdain for discriminating patients was echoed throughout the news media by far too many who profit from pill-pushing.

However, not everyone in the medical community is dismissing these new risks as insignificant. In an op-ed piece published in the New York Times, Dr. Eric Topol, a cardiologist at the Scripps Clinic stated, “We’re overdosing on cholesterol-lowering statins, and the consequence could be a sharp increase in type-2 diabetes.”

Statins were used for nearly 20 years before the evidence of these new risks emerged in 2010 during an analysis of a sampling of studies covering 91,000 patients. Moreover, there is reason to believe the risk of developing diabetes from the use of statins is far greater than anyone thus far has been willing to admit. The available data only cover patients who have been using a statin for less than 5 years, which rarely is the case.

Health is more complicated than a number

Statin drugs appear to be effective because they do, in fact, help to lower cholesterol levels. They do this by blocking the enzyme in your liver that is responsible for producing cholesterol. However, we know that cholesterol levels are a delicate balance of HDL and LDL. Of course, one’s cholesterol level is only one of several important indicators of heart health. Merely lowering cholesterol levels is a change that in and of itself may offer little real protection against future health risks.

It is also worth noting that statins deplete the body’s level of coenzyme Q10, an essential enzyme that ironically protects the body from heart disease. Thus, the burden placed on other systems of the body when trying to force cholesterol in one direction can lead to any number of detrimental health issues, as well as immediate risks.

One healthy alternative? Or should we just follow orders?

Fear of disease as opposed to fear of the risks associated with consuming pharmaceuticals is the catalyst that drives profit for drug companies. The medical establishment would have you believe these drug warnings are mere “nuances” and “tweaks” rather than information which should lead to serious concern on the part of the patient and potentially result in a change in behavior.

If everyone were to wake up tomorrow and begin a daily exercise program, consume a diet based on whole – versus processed – foods, and take steps to limit stress, the use of statin drugs might largely become unnecessary. Or you can continue to follow the medical establishment’s injunction that you “just shut up and take your medicine.”

Sources for this article include:

http://www.nytimes.com
http://www.reuters.com
http://abcnews.go.com

About the author:
Paula Rothstein is a freelance writer and certified holistic health coach active in the area of natural health and health freedom advocacy. As a graduate of the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, she has gained insight into the political nature of food, the failings of a drug-dependent healthcare system, and the uniqueness of individual health. For more information, please visit: http://www.twincitieshealthcoaching.com.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035236_statin_drugs_warnings_diabetes.html#ixzz1p6kbYszu

Vitamin D found to shrink fibroid tumors

NaturalNews) Each year, roughly 200,000 women undergo a surgical procedure that involves the removal of their uteruses due to the growth of non-cancerous tumors known as uterine fibroids, which commonly develop in and around the walls of the uterus. But a new study published online in the journal Biology of Reproduction has found that vitamin D may effectively reduce the size of existing uterine fibroids, and may even help prevent them from forming in the first place.

For their study, Sunil K. Halder, Ph.D., and colleagues tested the effects of vitamin D on a group of rats said to be genetically predisposed to fibroid tumors. Twelve rats were divided into two groups of six, one of which received a continuous dose of vitamin D daily, and the other not receiving any treatment. The vitamin D group of rats received the human equivalent of what would be 1,400 international units (IU) of vitamin D daily.

After the three-week study period was completed, researchers noted that the untreated group of rats experienced significant enlarging of their fibroid tumors, while the vitamin D group experienced a significant shrinking of theirs. Overall, the vitamin D group’s tumors were roughly 75 percent smaller than the untreated group’s tumors, which demonstrates a clear causal relationship between vitamin D and the shrinking of fibroid tumors.

“The study results provide a promising new lead in the search for a non-surgical treatment for fibroids that doesn’t affect fertility,” said Louis De Paolo, Ph.D., chief of the Reproductive Sciences Branch of the National Institutes of Health‘s (NIH) Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

The findings are great news for women, since vitamin D is safe and side effect-free; inexpensive; and beneficial in a wide range of other therapeutic uses. Rather than have to undergo a highly-invasive surgical procedure, in other words, many women with developing fibroid tumors may potentially benefit from simply exposing themselves more regularly to natural sunlight, or by supplementing with natural vitamin D3 pills.

Since more than half the population is deficient in vitamin D, according to a 2010 study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, most people would benefit from recommendations to add a little extra vitamin D into their health regimen. Whether it is uterine fibroids, heart problems, chronic infections and illnesses, neurological problems, respiratory ailments, or skin diseases, natural vitamin D has been shown to provide therapeutic benefits with no negative side effects.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org

http://www.naturalnews.com/028357_vitamin_D_deficiency.html

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035234_vitamin_D_fibroids_tumors.html#ixzz1p6jDQyhT

Fatty Diets May Be Associated With Reduced Semen Quality

ScienceDaily (Mar. 13, 2012) — Men’s diets, in particular the amount and type of different fats they eat, could be associated with their semen quality according to the results of a study published online in the journal Human Reproduction.

The study of 99 men in the USA found an association between a high total fat intake and lower total sperm count and concentration. It also found that men who ate more omega-3 polyunsaturated fats (the type of fat often found in fish and plant oils) had better formed sperm than men who ate less.

However, the researchers warn that this is a small study, and its findings need to be replicated by further research in order to be sure about the role played by fats on men’s fertility. Professor Jill Attaman, who was a Clinical and Research Fellow in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Massachusetts General Hospital and an Instructor in Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology at Harvard Medical School at the time of the research* said: “In the meantime, if men make changes to their diets so as to reduce the amount of saturated fat they eat and increase their omega-3 intake, then this may not only improve their general health, but could improve their reproductive health too. At a global level, adopting these lifestyle modifications may improve general health, as high saturated fat diets are known to be a risk factor for a range of cardiovascular diseases; but, in addition, our research suggests that it could be beneficial for reproductive health worldwide.”

A number of previous studies have investigated the link between body mass index (BMI) and semen quality, with mixed results. However, little is known about the potential role of dietary fats and semen quality, and so Prof Attaman and her colleagues set out to investigate it in men attending a fertility clinic.

Between December 2006 and August 2010 they questioned the men about their diet and analysed samples of their semen; they also measured levels of fatty acids in sperm and seminal plasma in 23 of the 99 men taking part.

The men were divided into three groups according to the amount of fats they consumed. Those in the third with the highest fat intake had a 43% lower total sperm count and 38% lower sperm concentration than men in the third with the lowest fat intake. “Total sperm count” is defined as the total number of sperm in the ejaculate, while “sperm concentration” is defined as the concentration of sperm (number per unit volume). The World Health Organisation provides a definition of “normal” total sperm count and concentration as follows: the total number of spermatozoa in the ejaculate should be at least 39 million; the concentration of spermatozoa should be at least 15 million per ml.

The study found that the relationship between dietary fats and semen quality was largely driven by the consumption of saturated fats. Men consuming the most saturated fats had a 35% lower total sperm count than men eating the least, and a 38% lower sperm concentration. “The magnitude of the association is quite dramatic and provides further support for the health efforts to limit consumption of saturated fat given their relation with other health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease,” said Prof Attaman.

Men consuming the most omega-3 fats had slightly more sperm (1.9%) that were correctly formed than men in the third that had the lowest omega-3 intake.

Of note: 71% of all the men in the study were overweight or obese, and the health effects of this could also affect semen quality. However, the researchers made allowances for this. “We were able to isolate the independent effects of fat intake from those of obesity using statistical models,” said Prof Attaman. “Notably, the frequency of overweight and obesity among men in this study does not differ much from that among men in the general population in the USA (74%).”

The study is subject to a number of limitations that could affect the results; for instance, the use of a food frequency questionnaire might not accurately reflect men’s actual diets, and only one semen sample per man was collected. The authors point out that studies like theirs cannot show that dietary fats cause poor semen quality, only that there is an association between the two.

“To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date examining the influence of specific dietary fats on male fertility,” they write. But they conclude: “Given the limitations of the current study, in particular the fact that it is a cross-sectional analysis and that it is the first report of a relation between dietary fat and semen quality, it is essential that these findings be reproduced in future work.”

Prof Attaman and her colleagues are continuing to investigate how dietary and lifestyle factors influence fertility in men and women as well as the treatment outcomes of couples undergoing fertility treatment.

* Prof Jill Attaman is currently Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Dartmouth Medical School and a Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Subspecialist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.

Gluten attacks the brain and damages the nervous system

NaturalNews) Some people are literally stumbling through life thinking they are a klutz when really gluten is to blame. Before gastrointestinal symptoms like upset stomach appear, neurological damage may already be done, according to the Center for Peripheral Neuropathy. The Gluten Free Society calls gluten a “potential neurotoxin.” Gluten damage may cause everything from unexplained dizziness to numbness in the hands and feet.

Gluten ataxia

Approximately 10 percent of people with Celiac disease develop neurologic symptoms, according to the Center for Peripheral Neuropathy. Ataxia describes a neurologic condition characterized by jerky movements and an awkward gait. Gluten ataxia specifically describes a neurologic condition caused by a gluten sensitivity that leads to a wide range of symptoms, including:

• Difficultly concentrating
• Loss of balance
• Frequent falls
• Visual disturbances
• Trouble walking
• Tremors
• Trouble judging distances

In people with a gluten sensitivity, eating foods with the gluten protein triggers an autoimmune reaction. The body attacks the gluten with antibodies in the same way that antibodies attack viruses. This damages the intestines. Intestinal damage inhibits absorption of nutrients, often leading to nutrient deficiencies.

Vitamin deficiencies could be to blame for gluten ataxia, according to an article in the Feb/Mar 2011 issue of Living Without magazine. Another explanation is that something in the brain is similar enough to gluten that the antibodies released to attack gluten also attack the brain.

The exact cause for gluten ataxia is unknown, but what is clear is that eating gluten makes it worse. A study published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry in September 2003 found that participants with ataxia who followed a gluten-free diet demonstrated improvement in ataxia symptoms compared to the control group, and had significantly fewer antigliadin antibodies, or “anti-gluten” antibodies, after one year.

Gluten neuropathy

Neuropathy, or peripheral neuropathy, describes a range of disorders characterized by nerve damage to one or more nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord. Often the cause of the neuropathy is unknown, though autoimmune diseases and vitamin deficiencies are some of the potential causes, according to the Mayo Clinic. Gluten neuropathy is when the autoimmune response is the root cause of the nerve damage.

A study published in Muscle & Nerve journal in December 2006 found that participants with neuropathy who followed a gluten-free diet showed significant improvement in symptoms after one year. The control group reported worsening of symptoms.

Treatment

People who have a gluten intolerance do not respond to simple allergy tests like someone with a milk or nut allergy might. The gentlest way to figure out if someone is sensitive to gluten is dietary therapy. Avoid gluten for several weeks, then reintroduce it and observe any reactions.

Once it is known that a person has a problem with gluten there is only one form of treatment: abstinence. People with any degree of gluten sensitivity or intolerance must completely give it up. This means not only avoiding obvious foods like bread and pasta, but also foods like soy sauce and licorice that contain small amounts of wheat.

Fortunately, there are many alternatives. Pastas made with rice flour or quinoa are gluten-free. Rice bread can replace bread made from grains containing gluten. Buckwheat flour is gluten-free and works well for pancakes. Some companies even make wheat-free soy sauce. It is simply a matter of reading labels and shopping around.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17013890

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12933922

http://www.glutenfreesociety.org

http://peripheralneuropathycenter.uchicago.edu

http://www.livingwithout.com/issues/4_12/ataxia-2366-1.html?pg=1

http://www.livingwithout.com/issues/4_12/ataxia-2366-1.html?pg=2

http://www.medicinenet.com/celiac_disease_gluten_free_diet/page3.htm

http://americanceliac.org/celiac-disease/diagnosis/

http://www.mayoclinic.com

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/147963.php

http://www.naturalnews.com

About the author:
Sarka-Jonae Miller is a health writer and novelist. She was certified as a personal fitness trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine and the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America. She also worked as a massage therapist, group exercise instructor and assistant martial arts instructor.
Miller’s premiere novel, “Between Boyfriends,” was recently published http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006Q6TSCS/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035224_gluten_nervous_system_brain_damage.html#ixzz1p6dNn8vF

Losing Belly Fat, Whether from a Low-Carb or a Low-Fat Diet, Helps Improve Blood Vessel Function

ScienceDaily (Mar. 13, 2012) — Overweight people who shed pounds, especially belly fat, can improve the function of their blood vessels no matter whether they are on a low-carb or a low-fat diet, according to a study being presented by Johns Hopkins researchers at an American Heart Association scientific meeting in San Diego on March 13 that is focused on cardiovascular disease prevention. 

In the six-month weight-loss study, Hopkins researchers found that the more belly fat the participants lost, the better their arteries were able to expand when needed, allowing more blood to flow more freely. The researchers also found that participants in the study who were on a low-carb diet lost about ten pounds more, on average, than those who were on a low-fat diet. Being overweight increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, especially if the fat is accumulated in the belly above the waist.

“After six months, those who were on the low-carb diet lost an average of 28.9 pounds versus 18.7 pounds among those on the low-fat diet,” says lead investigator Kerry J. Stewart, Ed.D., a professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of clinical and research exercise physiology at the Johns Hopkins Heart and Vascular Institute.

Stewart and his colleagues studied 60 men and women who weighed an average of 215 pounds at the start of the program. Half of the participants went on a low-carb diet while the others followed a low-fat diet. All took part in moderate exercise and their diets provided a similar amount of calories each day.

In order to evaluate the health of the participants’ blood vessels before and after the weight loss program, the researchers conducted a blood flow test by constricting circulation in the upper arm for five minutes with a blood pressure cuff. With this type of test, when the cuff is released, a healthier artery will expand more, allowing more blood to flow through the artery. The researchers measured how much blood reached the fingertips before, during, and after the constriction of the artery. Stewart says this test can give an indication of the overall health of the vascular system throughout the body. The researchers found that the more belly fat a person had lost, the greater the blood flow to the finger, signaling better the function of the artery.

“Our study demonstrated that the amount of improvement in the vessels was directly linked to how much central, or belly fat, the individuals lost, regardless of which diet they were on,” says Stewart. “This is important since there have been concerns that a low-carb diet, which means eating more fat, may have a harmful effect on cardiovascular health. These results showed no harmful effects from the low-carb diet.”

In the low-carb diet used in the study, up to 30 percent of calories came from carbs such as bread, pasta and certain fruits, while 40 percent was from fat consumed from meat, dairy products and nuts. In contrast, the low-fat diet consisted of no more than 30 percent of calories from fat and 55 percent from carbs.

Stewart notes that participants on the low-carb diet lost more weight and at a faster pace, on average, which has also been seen in several other studies. He says eating higher amounts of carbohydrates can slow down the rate of body fat loss while on a weight reduction diet.

The findings were consistent with early results presented by Stewart in June 2011 at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Denver. That initial report was based on results after participants in the study had lost their first 10 pounds. These longer-term results show that weight loss, along with exercise, is important for improving vascular health, and suggests following a low-carb diet rather than the conventionally recommended low-fat diet for weight loss is not a concern in terms of vascular health.

Aspartame danger – urgent warning about tumors and seizures

NaturalNews) The laws governing the sale of drugs and food additives require substances be safe for human consumption. The artificial sweetener aspartame primarily consumed in beverages and as a popular sugar substitute has consistently been found to cause tumors and brain seizures in animal subjects. In 2005, a European Cancer Research Center, the Ramazzini Foundation, called for an urgent re-examination of aspartame in food and beverages to protect children. This call is made in the face of the US FDA stand that aspartame is safe for human consumption on the ground that “aspartame as a carcinogen is not supported by data.”

Aspartame: A brief history

As early as 1960 aspartame was determined to be a dangerous chemical and the emerging research years later only served to affirm the true nature of this artificial sweetener. Over the years, aspartame has been found to create holes in brain tissue, adversely affect the brain and nerve development in the fetus, cause cancer, migraines, headaches, seizures, convulsions and even retinal damage. With this amount of negative findings, aspartame should have been removed from the market years ago!

Ironically, aspartame was indeed removed from the market after it was already approved for limited use based on tests selected by Searle, the company who originally produced the artificial sweetener. This was after Dr. John Olney, a research psychiatrist from Washington School of Medicine, revealed that consumption of aspartic acid, a major ingredient in aspartame, produced holes in the brains of animal subjects.

After two task forces that found questionable laboratory practices as well as findings, the FDA ordered a grand jury investigation of aspartame studies, but lawyers for the government failed to initiate a legal action against Searle. Time ran out, and the grand jury investigation had to be terminated. Of interest to note was that one of the lawyers for the government, U.S. attorney William Conlon, later joined the law firm representing Searle.

Unfazed by this setback, the FDA this time recommended a Public Board Inquiry which recommended that aspartame be kept off the market until further tests could prove that it did not cause tumors. This led to a formation of another team of experts brought together to look into the Public Board of Inquiry’s conclusions. This team found itself in a deadlock over aspartame approval, causing the FDA Commissioner not to approve aspartame this time.

In April 1981, Dr. Arthur Hayes was appointed the new Commissioner for the FDA and he later approved aspartame for use in dry goods. In 1983, he also approved aspartame for use in diet drinks, conveniently leaving months later to work for Searle’s advertising agency.

Warning to aspartame consumers

We can only guess and read between the lines what kind of politics it took to get aspartame approved. After more than 8,000 complaints on Nutrasweet side effects, a list of symptoms attributed to aspartame from complaints submitted to the FDA was made public. This list included among others: hallucinations, diarrhea, seizures, depression, migraine, fatigue and insomnia. Aspartame has also been linked to tumors, cancer and infertility.

Except for a brief declaration that carefully controlled clinical studies showed aspartame is not an allergen, the FDA merely issued an advisory that products containing aspartame must include a warning to phenylketonurics, people sensitive to the compound phenylalanine. It still continues to adhere to its stand that “aspartame as a carcinogen is not supported by data.”

Aspartame was never tested on humans before its approval. Now, it is found in 6,000 products and consumed by more than 250 million people, with Americans consuming around half of the world supply. By default, we have now become the test subjects for aspartame’s safety. Unwittingly we are providing evidence to aspartame’s toxicity through the devastating effects it is slowly producing among its consumers. The list of complaints submitted to the FDA as well as from anecdotal reports does not seem to end anytime soon. If the government chooses to turn a blind eye on aspartame, let us at least choose not to be a willing conspirator and suffer the consequences of being a willing victim.

Sources for this article:

http://www.fda.gov
http://www.colorado.edu
http://www.aspartame.org/aspartame_experts_regulatory2.html
http://www.sweetpoison.com
http://answers.hhs.gov/questions/3011

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035195_aspartame_brain_tumors_seizures.html#ixzz1ocMS6hxE