Benefits of cinnamon – surprising health facts

NaturalNews) A shaker of cinnamon often sits on the spice rack in most of our kitchens. Given its frequent use in sugary baked goods, many health mavens overlook cinnamon’s centuries-old history as a healing substance, focusing on more exotic herbs rather than a brown powder found in Grandma’s kitchen. Yet cinnamon, derived from the bark of a tree commonly found in South Asia and the Middle East region, not only adds flavor to pies, it also delivers a host of health benefits.

Ancient India’s Healing Tradition

Ayurveda, the ancient healing system of India, often uses cinnamon to stimulate circulation as well as to increase the bio-availability of other herbs. Ayurvedic healers, prescribe remedies based on an individual’s dosha or type. Ayurveda sees cinnamon as an appropriate remedy for people who belong to the kapha type (characterized as sturdy, heavy, calm, slow and moist) and the vata type (thin, cold, prone to nervousness) since cinnamon tends to have a heating and energizing effect. People who belong to the pitta type (fiery, oily, sharp) can partake of cinnamon in moderation.

Traditional Chinese Medicine

Herbalists and acupuncturists in the Chinese tradition value cinnamon for its warming qualities. Doctors of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) may prescribe cinnamon, often in combination with another warming substance such as ginger, to ward off colds. TCM healers may prescribe cinnamon for disorders associated with the kidney meridian.

Anti-Viral

During the 1918 influenza outbreak, workers at cinnamon factories seemed immune to the Spanish flu which decimated the population. A potent new form of cinnamon extract may even protect against HIV. An Israeli researcher, taking a cue from a Biblical reference to high priests using a holy oil containing cinnamon, in 2007 developed a powerful cinnamon extract which may protect against modern viruses like the Avian flu.

Blood Sugar Control

There may be a touch of ancient wisdom at work in all the recipes which combine cinnamon with high-carb and high-fat ingredients. Cinnamon can mitigate the impact these foods have on blood sugar levels, slowing the rate at which the stomach empties after meals and thereby reducing the potential spike in blood sugar. Cinnamon can offer aid to people who have type 2 diabetes by preventing insulin resistance and has even been recommended by the American Diabetes Association. Research has shown cinnamon outperforms diabetes drugs. In a study published in The Journal of Diabetic Medicine, research subjects given cinnamon supplements experienced greater improvement in blood sugar levels than those who received standard diabetes drugs.

Muscle to Fat Ratio

Studies indicate that cinnamon supplements go beyond just improving blood glucose levels; they can also reduce body fat percentage and help increase lean muscle mass.

Scent

If people at the holiday dinner table seem especially alert when the cinnamon-spiced pumpkin pie is being served, it might be because of its scent, not just an appetite for sweets. A 2004 study found that the smell of cinnamon helped boost brain function. Study participants performance on tasks involving virtual recognition memory, attentional processes, working memory, and visual-motor speed while using a computer were measured comparing the relative effects of jasmine, peppermint, cinnamon and no odor. Cinnamon had the strongest positive effect on study subjects’ cognitive processing skills. Cinnamon’s aroma comes from cinnamonaldehyde, an essential oil in the bark of cinnamon trees.

Anti-Microbial

Cinnamon has the ability to inhibit the growth of harmful bacteria, molds and yeasts, including Candida yeast. In a 2003 study, two batches of vegetable broth were refrigerated, one with, and one without cinnamon oil. The broth with the cinnamon oil was resistant to food-borne pathogenic Bacillus cereus for at least 60 days. Researchers in this study observed that the cinnamon not only served as an effective preservative but also improved the flavor of the broth. In another study, researchers at Kansas State University discovered that cinnamon eliminates E. coli in unpasteurized apple cider.

Sources:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?…

http://altmedicine.about.com/od/cin…

http://www.naturalnews.com/031133_c…

http://www.naturalnews.com/029894_h…

http://www.naturalnews.com/031373_g…

http://www.naturalnews.com/033246_c…

http://www.bluelotusayurveda.com/do…

http://www.desertbloomherbs.com/mon…

http://curezone.com/forums/am.asp?i…

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/rel…

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/034260_cinnamon_health_benefits.html#ixzz1f2hV63q1

Benefits of cinnamon – surprising health facts

NaturalNews) A shaker of cinnamon often sits on the spice rack in most of our kitchens. Given its frequent use in sugary baked goods, many health mavens overlook cinnamon’s centuries-old history as a healing substance, focusing on more exotic herbs rather than a brown powder found in Grandma’s kitchen. Yet cinnamon, derived from the bark of a tree commonly found in South Asia and the Middle East region, not only adds flavor to pies, it also delivers a host of health benefits.

Ancient India’s Healing Tradition

Ayurveda, the ancient healing system of India, often uses cinnamon to stimulate circulation as well as to increase the bio-availability of other herbs. Ayurvedic healers, prescribe remedies based on an individual’s dosha or type. Ayurveda sees cinnamon as an appropriate remedy for people who belong to the kapha type (characterized as sturdy, heavy, calm, slow and moist) and the vata type (thin, cold, prone to nervousness) since cinnamon tends to have a heating and energizing effect. People who belong to the pitta type (fiery, oily, sharp) can partake of cinnamon in moderation.

Traditional Chinese Medicine

Herbalists and acupuncturists in the Chinese tradition value cinnamon for its warming qualities. Doctors of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) may prescribe cinnamon, often in combination with another warming substance such as ginger, to ward off colds. TCM healers may prescribe cinnamon for disorders associated with the kidney meridian.

Anti-Viral

During the 1918 influenza outbreak, workers at cinnamon factories seemed immune to the Spanish flu which decimated the population. A potent new form of cinnamon extract may even protect against HIV. An Israeli researcher, taking a cue from a Biblical reference to high priests using a holy oil containing cinnamon, in 2007 developed a powerful cinnamon extract which may protect against modern viruses like the Avian flu.

Blood Sugar Control

There may be a touch of ancient wisdom at work in all the recipes which combine cinnamon with high-carb and high-fat ingredients. Cinnamon can mitigate the impact these foods have on blood sugar levels, slowing the rate at which the stomach empties after meals and thereby reducing the potential spike in blood sugar. Cinnamon can offer aid to people who have type 2 diabetes by preventing insulin resistance and has even been recommended by the American Diabetes Association. Research has shown cinnamon outperforms diabetes drugs. In a study published in The Journal of Diabetic Medicine, research subjects given cinnamon supplements experienced greater improvement in blood sugar levels than those who received standard diabetes drugs.

Muscle to Fat Ratio

Studies indicate that cinnamon supplements go beyond just improving blood glucose levels; they can also reduce body fat percentage and help increase lean muscle mass.

Scent

If people at the holiday dinner table seem especially alert when the cinnamon-spiced pumpkin pie is being served, it might be because of its scent, not just an appetite for sweets. A 2004 study found that the smell of cinnamon helped boost brain function. Study participants performance on tasks involving virtual recognition memory, attentional processes, working memory, and visual-motor speed while using a computer were measured comparing the relative effects of jasmine, peppermint, cinnamon and no odor. Cinnamon had the strongest positive effect on study subjects’ cognitive processing skills. Cinnamon’s aroma comes from cinnamonaldehyde, an essential oil in the bark of cinnamon trees.

Anti-Microbial

Cinnamon has the ability to inhibit the growth of harmful bacteria, molds and yeasts, including Candida yeast. In a 2003 study, two batches of vegetable broth were refrigerated, one with, and one without cinnamon oil. The broth with the cinnamon oil was resistant to food-borne pathogenic Bacillus cereus for at least 60 days. Researchers in this study observed that the cinnamon not only served as an effective preservative but also improved the flavor of the broth. In another study, researchers at Kansas State University discovered that cinnamon eliminates E. coli in unpasteurized apple cider.

Sources:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?…

http://altmedicine.about.com/od/cin…

http://www.naturalnews.com/031133_c…

http://www.naturalnews.com/029894_h…

http://www.naturalnews.com/031373_g…

http://www.naturalnews.com/033246_c…

http://www.bluelotusayurveda.com/do…

http://www.desertbloomherbs.com/mon…

http://curezone.com/forums/am.asp?i…

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/rel…

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/034260_cinnamon_health_benefits.html#ixzz1f2hONaSB

Omega-3 fats reduce systemic inflammation and lower feelings of anxiety

NaturalNews) The Omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA continue to garner well deserved attention as essential components of human health. Researchers publishing in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity show that the long-chain fat duo significantly lowers elevated levels of systemic inflammation, the metabolic flame that promotes most chronic conditions from heart disease and cancer to dementia and diabetes. The study authors found that consuming more fish or supplementing with omega-3 fish oil reduced both anxiety and inflammation among a group of young healthy individuals. Many health-minded children and adults alike will want to ensure adequate fish consumption from diet or supplementation with fish oil to lower dangerous cellular inflammation and reduce the underlying effects of anxiety.

A team of researchers from Ohio State University set out to determine the science behind more than thirty years of data that suggests a link between psychological stress and immunity. Omega-3 fats including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are known to be critical nutrients required for early development and health maintenance in the human diet. Earlier research suggested that the long-chain fatty compounds might play a role in reducing the level of inflammatory metabolites in the body known to promote inflammation and even reduce depression.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Reduce the Effects of Stress and Anxiety by Twenty Percent

The study authors wanted to test the theory that increased production of inflammatory cytokines in the body was caused by psychological stress and that increased levels of omega-3 fats could be used to mitigate the metabolic process and reduce inflammation. They assembled a group of 68 volunteer medical students known to be under a high degree of stress. The students were divided into six groups and interviewed at six intervals during the study to determine their levels of stress, anxiety or depression. Half the participants were given omega-3 supplements while the other half were given placebo pills.

Study co-author Martha Belury, professor of human nutrition, explained: “The supplement was probably about four or five times the amount of fish oil you’d get from a daily serving of salmon, for example”. Or, it was an equivalent to 1,200 mg EPA/DHA from a fish oil supplement. The results of the psychological surveys demonstrated an important change in anxiety among the students. Those receiving the omega-3 supplements showed a 20 percent reduction in anxiety compared to the placebo group. Blood samples taken from the medical students showed a similar reduction in circulating inflammatory factors.

Inflammation is a natural immune response necessary to protect us and help the body heal. Systemic inflammation from stress and the release of cytokine chemicals in the body are behind many chronic illnesses ranging from arthritis to heart disease to cancer. Ensure proper omega-3 status by including fatty fish in your diet several times each week or by supplementing with an organically distilled fish oil supplement and lower stress, anxiety and whole-body inflammation.

Sources for this article include:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc…
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/rel…
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art…

About the author:
John Phillip is a Health Researcher and Author who writes regularly on the cutting edge use of diet, lifestyle modifications and targeted supplementation to enhance and improve the quality and length of life. John is the author of ‘Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan’, a comprehensive EBook explaining how to use Diet, Exercise, Mind and Targeted Supplementation to achieve your weight loss goal. Visit My Optimal Health Resource to continue reading the latest health news updates, and to download your Free 48 page copy of ‘Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan’.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/034256_omega-3_inflammation.html#ixzz1f2fEADqB

Start your day with water and lemon

NaturalNews) Clean water and fresh squeezed lemon is one of the most well tested energy boosters around. Most people in America rely on caffeinated beverages like coffee to get aroused in the morning. These adrenal stimulants produce dirty energy in the form of blood sugar swings and oxidative stress. Water with lemon produces clean energy by hydrating and oxygenating the body to extraordinary energy and mental clarity.

After sleeping through the night the bodily tissues are dehydrated and need clean, pure water to filter out toxins and improve energy production in the cells. Most individuals turn to stimulants like coffee in the morning to give them a jump start. Unfortunately, coffee is a diuretic that depletes your body of water reserves and essential minerals and electrolytes like sodium, potassium, calcium & magnesium.

People feel energized by coffee due to the effects of caffeine on the adrenal glands. Coffee stimulates these organs to pump out instant energy hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine. These hormones stimulate the body to breakdown stored sugar and release it into the bloodstream. This process causes abnormal blood sugar that increases oxidative stress, free radical formation and overall tissue damage.

This is called dirty energy because it produces a rampant amount of damage to the body in order to activate energy formation. Clean energy produces cellular energy without an excessive load of oxidative stress.

Food as Bioelectrical Energy

The food and beverages we eat provide electrically charged molecules that initiate energy production in our body. An ion is part of a molecule that carries an electrical charge. Positively charged ions are called “cations,” while negatively charged ions are called “anions.”

Most of the food we put into our bodies comes in a cationic form, while our natural digestive processes (hydrochloric acid, digestive enzymes, saliva) are anionic. Lemon is one of the only anionic foods on the planet. This means that it carries a very strong negative charge and is extremely electrically active.

Fresh lemon helps oxygenate the body and maximizes enzyme function. Lemon is known to stimulate the liver’s natural enzymes. This assists the liver in the process of dumping toxins like uric acid and of liquefying congested bile ducts.

Citric Acid Cleanses the System

Citric acid can also play a very important role in chelating out abnormal calcium stones. It has a unique ability to form soluble complexes with calcium that many have used to eliminate pancreatic stones and kidney stones. This mechanism can also help prevent calcium deposits from building up in the arteries that promote cardiovascular disease.

Clean water with lemon provides the body with hydration, anti-oxidants and electrolytes. Lemon is a rich source of the immune boosting vitamin C. It also has good quantities of electrolytes such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. Lemon is a tremendous source of citrus bioflavonoid anti-oxidant phytonutrients that have been given the label Vitamin P.

Vitamin P consists of the flavonoid glycosides hesperetin and naringenin among others. Studies have shown that vitamin P enhances the anti-oxidant capability of vitamin C. These bioflavonoids also improve capillary permeability and overall blood flow. This is especially important for oxygenating tissues and maintaining normal blood pressure. These anti-oxidants have also been shown to reduce swelling, venous backup and edema.

Upon rising take 1 full lemon and squeeze it into 16-32 oz of fresh clean water and drink. Be sure to eat out the membranous parts of the lemon where the majority of the pectin fiber and citrus bioflavonoids are located. Stevia can be added to form sugar-free lemonade. Apple cider vinegar and various herbs can be used to boost enzymatic and anti-oxidant potential.

Sources for this Article Include
http://www.quantumbalancing.com/new…
http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/le…
http://www.naturalnews.com/033649_c…

About the author:
Dr. David Jockers owns and operates Exodus Health Center in Kennesaw, Ga. He is a Maximized Living doctor. His expertise is in weight loss, customized nutrition & exercise, & structural corrective chiropractic care. For more information go to www.exodushc.com To find a Maximized Living doctor near you go to www.maximizedliving.com

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/034249_lemon_juice_energy.html#ixzz1f2dr4ObZ

Moderate Alcohol Consumption Is Associated With Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth, Study Finds

ScienceDaily (Oct. 31, 2011) — Just one drink per day for women — two for men — could lead to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and subsequently cause gastrointestinal symptoms like bloating, gas, abdominal pain, constipation and diarrhea, according to the results of a new study unveiled at the American College of Gastroenterology’s (ACG) 76th Annual Scientific meeting in Washington, DC.

The retrospective review, “Moderate Alcohol Consumption is Associated with Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth,” looked at the charts of 198 patients who underwent lactulose hydrogen breath testing (LHBT) to determine the presence of SIBO, and found that any current alcohol consumption was significantly associated with the presence of SIBO — and neither smoking nor use of heartburn drugs called PPIs was associated with an increased risk of SIBO.

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is a condition where abnormally large numbers of bacteria grow in the small intestine. Normally the small intestine contains a relatively low number of bacteria in contrast to the large intestine, which should contain a larger number of bacteria. In patients with SIBO, the abnormally large numbers of bacteria in the small intestine use for their growth many of the nutrients that would otherwise be absorbed.

As a result, a person with small bowel bacterial overgrowth may not absorb enough nutrients and become malnourished. In addition, the breakdown of nutrients by the bacteria in the small intestines can produce gas as well as lead to a change in bowel habits.

While previous studies have focused on alcoholics, who were found to have high rates of SIBO, this study by Scott Gabbard, MD and colleagues at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and the Mayo Clinic, is one of the first to look at the relationship between moderate alcohol consumption and SIBO. Moderate alcohol consumption means no more than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men, with twelve ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1-1⁄2 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits counting as one drink, according to the USDA dietary guidelines.

An overwhelming majority (95 percent) of the 198 patients in the study drank a moderate amount of alcohol, sometimes less than 1 drink per day, said Dr. Gabbard, who also indicated that only four of the patients drank more alcohol — a finding he noted indicates that consumption of even the slightest amount of alcohol could have an impact on gut health.

“These findings are significant because we now know that any bit of alcohol consumption–not just the amount consumed by alcoholics — is a strong predictor of a positive lactulose hydrogen breath testing and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth,” he said. “While typical treatment for SIBO has been antibiotics, probiotics or a combination of the two, the question now becomes what is the exact association between moderate alcohol consumption and SIBO and whether alcohol cessation can be used as a treatment for this potentially harmful condition.”

BASF tries (again) to push ‘Frankenpotatoes’ on Europe

NaturalNews) Europeans have made it abundantly clear time and time again that they want nothing to do with genetically-modified organisms (GMOs). But chemical giant BASF refuses to take no for an answer, and is once again pushing for EU approval of a “Frankenpotato” known as Fortuna that, if approved, would represent the EU’s second new legalized GMO in more than a decade.

Unlike most Americans, Europeans generally take a keen interest in the integrity of their food supply, and are very outspoken against government actions that promote tampering with it. This is a big reason why GMOs have to be properly labeled throughout Europe, and why most recent attempts to legalize more “Frankencrops” in the EU have failed.

But the EU Commission is gradually easing up to the idea of approving more GMOs, despite widespread public opposition. Last year, for instance, BASF fought hard to gain EU approval for Amflora, another GM potato designed for making industrial-use starch, and the company succeeded.

Though more than a million Europeans signed a petition to block Amflora’s approval, it was eventually forced through without proper independent studies verifying safety. In response, activists in Sweden created a human shield at the BASF facility where Amflora was to be planted (http://www.naturalnews.com/032544_B…).

But approval of BASF’s Fortuna would mark an even worse GMO milestone in Europe than Amflora. Unlike Amflora, Fortuna is intended to be sold directly to consumers. And thanks to the EU’s new “streamlined” approval process for GM crops, as well as the compromise of its zero-tolerance policy against GMO contamination, Fortuna’s approval could be ramrodded through as well (http://www.naturalnews.com/031977_G…).

BASF claims it could get Fortuna, which is alleged to resist late blight, to market as soon as 2014. The European public, though, is unlikely to stand for it. Should the EU Commission decide to approve Fortuna without proper safety analysis like it did for Amflora, the outrage is sure to be vast and vehement.

“Blight is a serious problem for farmers, but we should not focus on technical short-term fixes that create new environmental risks, increase farmers dependence on multinational companies and reduce genetic diversity,” says Greenpeace EU agriculture policy adviser Stefanie Hundsdorfer. “To the contrary, we should put our resources into sustainable ways to tackle blight, such as crop rotation and conventional breeding of potatoes.”

Sources for this article include:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011…

http://www.greenpeace.org/eu-unit/e…

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/034246_BASF_GMOs.html#ixzz1f2ZTdoSA

Mid-Morning Snacking May Sabotage Weight-Loss Efforts

ScienceDaily (Nov. 28, 2011) — Women dieters who grab a snack between breakfast and lunch lose less weight compared to those who abstain from a mid-morning snack, according to a study led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

The results of this randomized trial, led by Anne McTiernan, M.D., Ph.D., a member of the Hutchinson Center’s Public Health Sciences Division and director of its Prevention Center, will be published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

In the course of the year-long study, the researchers found that mid-morning snackers lost an average of 7 percent of their total body weight while those who ate a healthy breakfast but did not snack before lunch lost more than 11 percent of their body weight. For the study, a snack was defined as any food or drink that was consumed between main meals.

“We think this finding may not relate necessarily to the time of day one snacks, but rather to the short interval between breakfast and lunch. Mid-morning snacking therefore might be a reflection of recreational or mindless eating habits rather than eating to satisfy true hunger,” said McTiernan, the corresponding author of the paper.

While snacking too close to a main meal may be detrimental to weight loss, waiting too long between meals also may sabotage dieting efforts, she said. “Snacking could be part of a dieter’s toolkit if they’re eating in response to true hunger. Individuals should determine if they experience long intervals — such as more than five hours — between meals. Adding a snack might help people deal better with hunger and ultimately help them to make more sound choices at their next meal.”

The study also revealed that women who reported eating more than two snacks a day had higher fiber intake than those who snacked less frequently, and afternoon nibblers ate more fruits and vegetables compared to women who didn’t snack between lunch and dinner.

The ancillary study, part of a larger randomized clinical trial designed to test the effects of nutrition and exercise on breast cancer risk, involved 123 overweight-to-obese postmenopausal Seattle-area women, ages 50 to 75, who were randomly assigned to either a diet-alone intervention (goal: 1,200 to 2,000 calories a day, depending on starting weight, and fewer than 30 percent of daily calories from fat), or diet plus exercise (same calorie and fat restrictions plus 45 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise per day, five days a week). While the women received nutrition counseling they were not given any specific instructions or recommendations about snacking behavior.

At the end of the study the women were asked to record the time, type and frequency of meals consumed on a normal day. Percent of calories from fat, fiber and fruit and vegetable intake were also estimated using a food-frequency questionnaire.

“Many people think that a weight-loss program has to mean always feeling hungry,” McTiernan said. “Our study suggests that snacking may actually help with weight loss if not done too close to another meal, particularly if the snacks are healthy foods that can help you feel full without adding too many calories.”

Nationwide surveys indicate that 97 percent of U.S. adults report snacking, and such behavior is consistent across age groups. One study that surveyed a national random sample of more than 1,500 adults found that the most commonly preferred snacks were salty and crunchy items such as potato chips, pretzels and nuts; baked goods such as cookies and cakes; fruits; and ice cream.

Not all snacks are created equal, however. Foods less conducive to weight loss include empty-calorie items that contribute fat, salt, sugar and little nutritional value, such as potato chips and sugar-sweetened beverages.

For a woman on a weight-loss diet, a healthy snack should pack a nutritional wallop without breaking the calorie bank. “Since women on a weight-loss program only have a limited number of calories to spend each day, it is important for them to incorporate nutrient-dense foods that are no more than 200 calories per serving,” McTiernan said. “The best snacks for a weight-loss program are proteins such as low-fat yogurt, string cheese, or a small handful of nuts; non-starchy vegetables; fresh fruits; whole-grain crackers; and non-calorie beverages such as water, coffee and tea.”

The National Cancer Institute funded the research and participated in the study, which also involved investigators from the University of Washington and the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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Key to Aging? Key Molecular Switch for Telomere Extension by Telomerase Identified

ScienceDaily (Nov. 23, 2011) — Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine describe for the first time a key target of DNA damage checkpoint enzymes that must be chemically modified to enable stable maintenance of chromosome ends by telomerase, an enzyme thought to play a key role in cancer and aging.


Their findings are reported online in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.

Telomeres are the natural ends of chromosomes, consisting of specialized DNA-and-protein structures that protect chromosome ends and ensure faithful duplication of chromosomes in actively dividing cells. An essential player in telomere maintenance is an enzyme complex called telomerase. Without telomerase, telomeres become progressively shorter each time the cell divides.

If telomeres become too short, chromosome ends will be recognized as broken, prompting DNA-damage checkpoint proteins to halt cell division and DNA repair proteins to fuse or rearrange the chromosome ends. Telomere dysfunction has been linked to tumor formation and premature aging in humans.

The UIC study, led by Toru Nakamura, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular genetics, focused on understanding how two DNA-damage checkpoint enzymes called ATM and ATR contribute to the regulation of telomerase.

“Our current study found that ATM and ATR help to switch on the telomere complex by chemically modifying a specific target protein bound to telomeric DNA, which then attracts telomerase, much like honey bees are attracted if flowers open and show bright colors,” Nakamura said.

The study was done in fission yeast cells, a model organism that utilizes very similar protein complexes as human cells do to maintain telomeres. Previous discoveries in fission yeast have provided key information that helped identify several key factors required in maintenance of human telomeres.

Nakamura thinks that a similar ATM/ATR-dependent molecular switch may exist in human cells to regulate telomere maintenance. However, certain details of the protective complex regulation may be different, he noted.

Because deregulation of telomere maintenance mechanisms is a key event in tumor formation, understanding how cellular components collaborate to generate functional telomeres may be important to finding ways to prevent cancer, Nakamura said.

The study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Federal Work Study Program. Bettina Moser, UIC research assistant professor in biochemistry and molecular genetics, was first author of the study. Graduate student Ya-Ting Chang and undergraduate student Jorgena Kosti also contributed to the study.

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Garlic oil compound found to offer heart protection

NaturalNews) Researchers from the Emory University (EU) School of Medicine in Atlanta, Ga., have discovered a natural compound derived from garlic oil, known as diallyl trisulfide, that protects against heart damage. When taken after a heart attack, during cardiac surgery, or as a treatment for heart failure, this powerful compound was found to reduce tissue damage by 61 percent.

David Lefer, PhD, professor of surgery at EU and director of the school’s Cardiothoracic Surgery Research Laboratory, and postdoctoral fellow Benjamin Predmore tested the effects of diallyl trisulfide on a group of mice. The duo deliberately blocked the coronary arteries of the mice for 45 minutes in order to simulate a heart attack.

Just as they were about to release the blockages, the team administered diallyl sulfide to some of the mice. After the compound was administered, the team observed a reduction in the proportion of heart tissue damage by 61 percent compared to mice that did not receive the compound.

“Interruption of oxygen and blood flow damages mitochondria, and loss of mitochondrial integrity can lead to cell death,” said Lefer. “We see that diallyl sulfide can temporarily turn down the function of mitochondria, preserving them and lowering the production of reactive oxygen species.”

The findings are noteworthy because, currently, doctors typically inject hydrogen sulfide-producing drugs directly into heart patients. In high doses, hydrogen sulfide is a highly-toxic chemical gas that, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), can cause respiratory, immunological, lymphoreticular, cardiovascular, and neurological damage, as well as death, when inhaled (http://www.who.int/ipcs/publication…).

Diallyl sulfide, on the other hand, is simply a natural organosulfur compound in garlic oil that naturally produces small amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas. This method appears to be safer and come with less side effects than the synthetic drug-based versions.

The diallyl sulfides in garlic are also linked to the production of ferroportin. Ferroportin facilitates the release of stored iron in the body at times when it is needed, which is essential for the transport of oxygen from the lungs to bodily tissue, as well as for other functions.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea…

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/034226_garlic_oil_heart_protection.html#ixzz1eefJlWAX

Chiropractic care improves type I diabetes (case study

NaturalNews) Over 3 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with type I diabetes. This disorder is considered an auto-immune condition where the immune system destroys the insulin producing Beta cells of the pancreas. A new case study showed how chiropractic adjustments dramatically improved a 4 year old child’s ability to manage this disorder.

A large UK study has revealed that type 1 diabetes has increased 5-fold in children less than 5 years of age between the years of 1985 and 2004. During those same years there was a doubling in children under 15 years of age being diagnosed with type I diabetes. Studies in other European countries and the US have shown similar results.

Environmental Risk Factors

The most common risk factors include exposure to environmental toxins and other stressors. The list of toxins includes pesticides, herbicides, and household cleaning agents. Additionally, food allergens such as pasteurized cow’s milk, gluten and processed soy, peanuts, & eggs are thought to be possible triggers. Low maternal and infant vitamin D3 levels and less than 6 months of breast feeding appear to be very serious risk factors as well. Birth trauma affecting the upper cervical spine has been hypothesized as a risk factor by some experts.

A recent case study published in the November 2011 edition of the Journal of Pediatric, Maternal, & Family Health documents a case of a 4 year old child, who had terrific results stabilizing her blood sugar through chiropractic care.

The child’s mother described her as being a very healthy baby, who was not vaccinated at all and was breastfed for a full 12 months. She was officially diagnosed with type I diabetes at 2 years of age. The family ate a healthy, whole food based diet and avoided processed foods and other environmental toxins.

Understanding the role of Neuroendoimmunology

The nervous, endocrine and immune system are hardwired and work together to create optimal responses for the body to adapt and heal appropriately. The new study of neuroendoimmunology looks closely at this intimate relationship between bodily systems.

Neural dysfunctions due to spinal subluxations are stressful to the body and cause abnormal changes that lead to a poorly coordinated immune response. Chiropractic adjustments have been shown to reduce subluxations and boost the coordinated responses of the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems.

The patient was diagnosed with spinal subluxations in the upper cervical region. She began chiropractic care and was seen a total of 24 times over a 2 month period. During this 2 month period, she experienced a decrease in hemoglobin A1C from 7.2% to 6.5%. She also decreased the amount of insulin used from 15 units to 11 units per day.

These results are quite remarkable because the literature states that intensive medical treatment of type I diabetes often does not succeed in lowering A1C levels under 7.0%. Chiropractic care works by optimizing the neural connections throughout the body. This enhanced brain-body connection works to better coordinate immunity and hormone function throughout the body. This improvement in type I diabetes management is most likely a result of better cellular communication.

Sources For this Article Include:

http://www.chiropracticpediatricres…

http://www.naturalnews.com/031320_t…

http://www.naturalnews.com/031206_c…

About the author:
Dr. David Jockers owns and operates Exodus Health Center in Kennesaw, Ga. He is a Maximized Living doctor. His expertise is in weight loss, customized nutrition & exercise, & structural corrective chiropractic care. For more information go to www.exodushc.com To find a Maximized Living doctor near you go to www.maximizedliving.com

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/034222_chiropractic_care_type-1_diabetes.html#ixzz1eee3JYYh